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Effects of sit-up training versus core stabilization exercises on sit-up performance.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Childs, JD; Teyhen, DS; Benedict, TM; Morris, JB; Fortenberry, AD; McQueen, RM; Preston, JB; Wright, AC; Dugan, JL; George, SZ
Published in: Med Sci Sports Exerc
November 2009

PURPOSE: Core stabilization exercises target abdominal and trunk muscles without the excessive loading that occurs during sit-ups. However, core stabilization exercise programs (CSEP) have not been widely adopted in the US Army partially because of the perceived deleterious impact they would have on performance during the Army Physical Fitness Test. The purpose was to determine whether performing CSEP in lieu of sit-ups during unit physical training would have detrimental effects on sit-up performance and passing rates on the fitness test. METHODS: Soldiers (N = 2616) between 18 and 35 yr of age were randomized to receive a traditional exercise program (TEP) with sit-ups or CSEP. Subjects with a previous history of low back pain or other injury precluding participation in training were excluded. The training programs were completed four times per week for 12 wk. Performance was assessed at baseline and after 12 wk. RESULTS: Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in sit-up performance and overall fitness scores over time (P < 0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in overall fitness scores (P = 0.142) or sit-up performance (P = 0.543). However, CSEP resulted in a significant improvement in sit-up passing rates by 5.6% compared with 3.9% for the TEP group (P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: CSEP did not have a detrimental impact on sit-up performance or overall fitness scores or pass rates. There was a small but significantly greater increase in sit-up pass rate in the CSEP (5.6%) versus the TEP group (3.9%). Incorporating CSEP into Army physical training does not increase the risk of suboptimal performance on the Army's fitness test and may offer a small benefit for improving sit-up performance.

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Published In

Med Sci Sports Exerc

DOI

EISSN

1530-0315

Publication Date

November 2009

Volume

41

Issue

11

Start / End Page

2072 / 2083

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Texas
  • Sport Sciences
  • Physical Fitness
  • Physical Education and Training
  • Muscle Strength
  • Military Personnel
  • Male
  • Lumbar Vertebrae
  • Low Back Pain
 

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Childs, J. D., Teyhen, D. S., Benedict, T. M., Morris, J. B., Fortenberry, A. D., McQueen, R. M., … George, S. Z. (2009). Effects of sit-up training versus core stabilization exercises on sit-up performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 41(11), 2072–2083. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181a84db2
Childs, John D., Deydre S. Teyhen, Timothy M. Benedict, Jamie B. Morris, Andrew D. Fortenberry, Rene M. McQueen, Janice B. Preston, Alison C. Wright, Jessica L. Dugan, and Steven Z. George. “Effects of sit-up training versus core stabilization exercises on sit-up performance.Med Sci Sports Exerc 41, no. 11 (November 2009): 2072–83. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181a84db2.
Childs JD, Teyhen DS, Benedict TM, Morris JB, Fortenberry AD, McQueen RM, et al. Effects of sit-up training versus core stabilization exercises on sit-up performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Nov;41(11):2072–83.
Childs, John D., et al. “Effects of sit-up training versus core stabilization exercises on sit-up performance.Med Sci Sports Exerc, vol. 41, no. 11, Nov. 2009, pp. 2072–83. Pubmed, doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181a84db2.
Childs JD, Teyhen DS, Benedict TM, Morris JB, Fortenberry AD, McQueen RM, Preston JB, Wright AC, Dugan JL, George SZ. Effects of sit-up training versus core stabilization exercises on sit-up performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Nov;41(11):2072–2083.

Published In

Med Sci Sports Exerc

DOI

EISSN

1530-0315

Publication Date

November 2009

Volume

41

Issue

11

Start / End Page

2072 / 2083

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Texas
  • Sport Sciences
  • Physical Fitness
  • Physical Education and Training
  • Muscle Strength
  • Military Personnel
  • Male
  • Lumbar Vertebrae
  • Low Back Pain