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Psychological influences predict recovery following exercise induced shoulder pain.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Parr, J; Borsa, P; Fillingim, R; Kaiser, K; Tillman, MD; Manini, TM; Gregory, C; George, S
Published in: Int J Sports Med
March 2014

Predicting recovery following muscle injury can be difficult because it involves consideration of multiple factors. Our objective was to determine if psychological factors, sex, and peak pain and disability ratings could be predictive of delayed recovery following induced muscle injury. Healthy untrained volunteers (n=126; M:F 51:75) underwent a concentric/eccentric isokinetic exercise protocol on their dominant shoulder to induce fatigue, with individuals who reported pain (>0/10) at 96 h being classified as "not recovered". Individuals experiencing pain at 48 h were more likely not to be recovered (O.R.=1.62, p<0.001). Additionally, individuals with higher scores in pain catastrophizing at 48 h were more likely to experience pain at 96 h (O.R.=1.06, p<0.001). Pain duration (in days) was associated with pain scores at 48 h (β=0.385, p<0.001) and baseline anxiety (β=0.220, p=0.007). Fear of movement/re-injury at 96 h was found to be associated with pain catastrophizing at 48 h (β=0.537, p<0.001) and baseline levels of fear of pain (β=0.217, p=0.004). This study provides preliminary evidence that higher pain levels and pain catastrophizing following acute muscle injury are associated with poor recovery, higher fear of movement/re-injury and longer pain duration.

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Published In

Int J Sports Med

DOI

EISSN

1439-3964

Publication Date

March 2014

Volume

35

Issue

3

Start / End Page

232 / 237

Location

Germany

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Sport Sciences
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Sex Factors
  • Recurrence
  • Pain Measurement
  • Muscle, Skeletal
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
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Parr, J., Borsa, P., Fillingim, R., Kaiser, K., Tillman, M. D., Manini, T. M., … George, S. (2014). Psychological influences predict recovery following exercise induced shoulder pain. Int J Sports Med, 35(3), 232–237. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1345179
Parr, J., P. Borsa, R. Fillingim, K. Kaiser, M. D. Tillman, T. M. Manini, C. Gregory, and S. George. “Psychological influences predict recovery following exercise induced shoulder pain.Int J Sports Med 35, no. 3 (March 2014): 232–37. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1345179.
Parr J, Borsa P, Fillingim R, Kaiser K, Tillman MD, Manini TM, et al. Psychological influences predict recovery following exercise induced shoulder pain. Int J Sports Med. 2014 Mar;35(3):232–7.
Parr, J., et al. “Psychological influences predict recovery following exercise induced shoulder pain.Int J Sports Med, vol. 35, no. 3, Mar. 2014, pp. 232–37. Pubmed, doi:10.1055/s-0033-1345179.
Parr J, Borsa P, Fillingim R, Kaiser K, Tillman MD, Manini TM, Gregory C, George S. Psychological influences predict recovery following exercise induced shoulder pain. Int J Sports Med. 2014 Mar;35(3):232–237.
Journal cover image

Published In

Int J Sports Med

DOI

EISSN

1439-3964

Publication Date

March 2014

Volume

35

Issue

3

Start / End Page

232 / 237

Location

Germany

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Sport Sciences
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Sex Factors
  • Recurrence
  • Pain Measurement
  • Muscle, Skeletal
  • Middle Aged
  • Male