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Anisometropia at Age 5 Years After Unilateral Intraocular Lens Implantation During Infancy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Weakley, D; Cotsonis, G; Wilson, ME; Plager, DA; Buckley, EG; Lambert, SR; Infant Aphakia Treatment Study Group,
Published in: Am J Ophthalmol
August 2017

PURPOSE: To report the prevalence of anisometropia at age 5 years after unilateral intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in infants. DESIGN: Prospective randomized clinical trial. METHODS: Fifty-seven infants in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) with a unilateral cataract were randomized to IOL implantation with an initial targeted postoperative refractive error of either +8 diopters (D) (infants 28 to <48 days of age) or +6 D (infants 48-210 days of age). Anisometropia was calculated at age 5 years. Six patients were excluded from the analyses. RESULTS: Median age at cataract surgery was 2.2 months (interquartile range [IQR], 1.2, 3.5 months). The mean age at the age 5 years follow-up visit was 5.0 ± 0.1 years (range, 4.9-5.4 years). The median refractive error at the age 5 years visit of the treated eyes was -2.25 D (IQR -5.13, +0.88 D) and of the fellow eyes +1.50 D (IQR +0.88, +2.25). Median anisometropia was -3.50 D (IQR -8.25, -0.88 D); range -19.63 to +2.75 D. Patients with glaucoma in the treated eye (n = 9) had greater anisometropia (glaucoma, median -8.25 D; IQR -11.38, -5.25 D vs no glaucoma median -2.75; IQR -6.38, -0.75 D; P = .005). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of pseudophakic eyes had significant anisometropia at age 5 years. Anisometropia was greater in patients that developed glaucoma. Variability in eye growth and myopic shift continue to make refractive outcomes challenging for IOL implantation during infancy.

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Published In

Am J Ophthalmol

DOI

EISSN

1879-1891

Publication Date

August 2017

Volume

180

Start / End Page

1 / 7

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Pseudophakia
  • Prospective Studies
  • Ophthalmology & Optometry
  • Myopia
  • Male
  • Lenses, Intraocular
  • Lens Implantation, Intraocular
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant
  • Hyperopia
 

Citation

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Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Weakley, D., Cotsonis, G., Wilson, M. E., Plager, D. A., Buckley, E. G., Lambert, S. R., & Infant Aphakia Treatment Study Group, . (2017). Anisometropia at Age 5 Years After Unilateral Intraocular Lens Implantation During Infancy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study. Am J Ophthalmol, 180, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2017.05.008
Weakley, David, George Cotsonis, M Edward Wilson, David A. Plager, Edward G. Buckley, Scott R. Lambert, and Scott R. Infant Aphakia Treatment Study Group. “Anisometropia at Age 5 Years After Unilateral Intraocular Lens Implantation During Infancy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study.Am J Ophthalmol 180 (August 2017): 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2017.05.008.
Weakley D, Cotsonis G, Wilson ME, Plager DA, Buckley EG, Lambert SR, et al. Anisometropia at Age 5 Years After Unilateral Intraocular Lens Implantation During Infancy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2017 Aug;180:1–7.
Weakley, David, et al. “Anisometropia at Age 5 Years After Unilateral Intraocular Lens Implantation During Infancy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study.Am J Ophthalmol, vol. 180, Aug. 2017, pp. 1–7. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ajo.2017.05.008.
Weakley D, Cotsonis G, Wilson ME, Plager DA, Buckley EG, Lambert SR, Infant Aphakia Treatment Study Group. Anisometropia at Age 5 Years After Unilateral Intraocular Lens Implantation During Infancy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2017 Aug;180:1–7.
Journal cover image

Published In

Am J Ophthalmol

DOI

EISSN

1879-1891

Publication Date

August 2017

Volume

180

Start / End Page

1 / 7

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Pseudophakia
  • Prospective Studies
  • Ophthalmology & Optometry
  • Myopia
  • Male
  • Lenses, Intraocular
  • Lens Implantation, Intraocular
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant
  • Hyperopia