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Substance use through adolescence into early adulthood after childhood-diagnosed ADHD: findings from the MTA longitudinal study.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Molina, BSG; Howard, AL; Swanson, JM; Stehli, A; Mitchell, JT; Kennedy, TM; Epstein, JN; Arnold, LE; Hechtman, L; Vitiello, B; Hoza, B
Published in: J Child Psychol Psychiatry
June 2018

BACKGROUND: Inconsistent findings exist regarding long-term substance use (SU) risk for children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The observational follow-up of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA) provides an opportunity to assess long-term outcomes in a large, diverse sample. METHODS: Five hundred forty-seven children, mean age 8.5, diagnosed with DSM-IV combined-type ADHD and 258 classmates without ADHD (local normative comparison group; LNCG) completed the Substance Use Questionnaire up to eight times from mean age 10 to mean age 25. RESULTS: In adulthood, weekly marijuana use (32.8% ADHD vs. 21.3% LNCG) and daily cigarette smoking (35.9% vs. 17.5%) were more prevalent in the ADHD group than the LNCG. The cumulative record also revealed more early substance users in adolescence for ADHD (57.9%) than LNCG (41.9%), including younger first use of alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, and illicit drugs. Alcohol and nonmarijuana illicit drug use escalated slightly faster in the ADHD group in early adolescence. Early SU predicted quicker SU escalation and more SU in adulthood for both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Frequent SU for young adults with childhood ADHD is accompanied by greater initial exposure at a young age and slightly faster progression. Early SU prevention and screening is critical before escalation to intractable levels.

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Published In

J Child Psychol Psychiatry

DOI

EISSN

1469-7610

Publication Date

June 2018

Volume

59

Issue

6

Start / End Page

692 / 702

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • United States
  • Substance-Related Disorders
  • Marijuana Use
  • Male
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Developmental & Child Psychology
  • Cigarette Smoking
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Molina, B. S. G., Howard, A. L., Swanson, J. M., Stehli, A., Mitchell, J. T., Kennedy, T. M., … Hoza, B. (2018). Substance use through adolescence into early adulthood after childhood-diagnosed ADHD: findings from the MTA longitudinal study. J Child Psychol Psychiatry, 59(6), 692–702. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12855
Molina, Brooke S. G., Andrea L. Howard, James M. Swanson, Annamarie Stehli, John T. Mitchell, Traci M. Kennedy, Jeffery N. Epstein, et al. “Substance use through adolescence into early adulthood after childhood-diagnosed ADHD: findings from the MTA longitudinal study.J Child Psychol Psychiatry 59, no. 6 (June 2018): 692–702. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12855.
Molina BSG, Howard AL, Swanson JM, Stehli A, Mitchell JT, Kennedy TM, et al. Substance use through adolescence into early adulthood after childhood-diagnosed ADHD: findings from the MTA longitudinal study. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2018 Jun;59(6):692–702.
Molina, Brooke S. G., et al. “Substance use through adolescence into early adulthood after childhood-diagnosed ADHD: findings from the MTA longitudinal study.J Child Psychol Psychiatry, vol. 59, no. 6, June 2018, pp. 692–702. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/jcpp.12855.
Molina BSG, Howard AL, Swanson JM, Stehli A, Mitchell JT, Kennedy TM, Epstein JN, Arnold LE, Hechtman L, Vitiello B, Hoza B. Substance use through adolescence into early adulthood after childhood-diagnosed ADHD: findings from the MTA longitudinal study. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2018 Jun;59(6):692–702.
Journal cover image

Published In

J Child Psychol Psychiatry

DOI

EISSN

1469-7610

Publication Date

June 2018

Volume

59

Issue

6

Start / End Page

692 / 702

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • United States
  • Substance-Related Disorders
  • Marijuana Use
  • Male
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Developmental & Child Psychology
  • Cigarette Smoking