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Family Caregiving in the New Normal

Informal Care and Economic Stressors

Publication ,  Chapter
Van Houtven, CH
May 11, 2015

This chapter uses data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to describe how informal care provided by adult children and spousal caregivers interact with economic stress. Multiple economic factors influence whether a person becomes an informal caregiver. The economic impacts of caregiving are modest in the research literature, but readily quantifiable economic impacts may not provide a complete picture. The Great Recession offers an example of how the macroeconomic climate can affect informal care activities and informal caregivers' economic situations more generally. There are differences in real wealth, debt, debt-to-income ratios, housing insecurity, employment, and insurance coverage between caregivers and noncaregivers. Economic stress may create unintentional negative impacts on the caregiving dyad.

Duke Scholars

DOI

Publication Date

May 11, 2015

Start / End Page

105 / 133
 

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Van Houtven, C. H. (2015). Informal Care and Economic Stressors. In Family Caregiving in the New Normal (pp. 105–133). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-417046-9.00008-8
Van Houtven, C. H. “Informal Care and Economic Stressors.” In Family Caregiving in the New Normal, 105–33, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-417046-9.00008-8.
Van Houtven CH. Informal Care and Economic Stressors. In: Family Caregiving in the New Normal. 2015. p. 105–33.
Van Houtven, C. H. “Informal Care and Economic Stressors.” Family Caregiving in the New Normal, 2015, pp. 105–33. Scopus, doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-417046-9.00008-8.
Van Houtven CH. Informal Care and Economic Stressors. Family Caregiving in the New Normal. 2015. p. 105–133.

DOI

Publication Date

May 11, 2015

Start / End Page

105 / 133