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Associations between diabetes, leanness, and the risk of death in the Japanese general population: the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Yano, Y; Kario, K; Ishikawa, S; Ojima, T; Gotoh, T; Kayaba, K; Tsutsumi, A; Shimada, K; Nakamura, Y; Kajii, E; JMS Cohort Study Group,
Published in: Diabetes Care
May 2013

OBJECTIVE: To examine the BMI-stratified associations between diabetes and the risks of all-cause death, cardiovascular disease (CVD) death, and cancer death. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using a prospective study with 12 rural Japanese general populations (n = 3,641, mean age, 53.7 years; 33.5% men), we examined the associations between diabetes and the risk of all-cause death, CVD death, and cancer death. We also examined the effects of BMI and age on such associations. RESULTS: During an average duration of 10.2 years (37,278 person-years), 240 deaths occurred (54 deaths from CVD, 101 from cancer, and 85 from other causes). Cox regression analysis showed leanness (defined as the lowest quartile of entire BMI; mean, 19.5 kg/m(2)), but not obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)), and diabetes were independently associated with an increased risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] 1.70 and 1.65, respectively; both P < 0.01.). Stratification with cause-specific deaths showed that leanness and obesity were associated with CVD death (HR 3.77 and 2.94, respectively), whereas diabetes was associated with cancer death (HR 1.87; all P < 0.05). The increased risk of all-cause death in diabetes was substantially higher in lean subjects aged <65 years (HR 3.4) or those aged ≥65 years (HR 4.2), whereas the risk in obese diabetes patients was significant only in subjects aged <65 years (HR 2.32; all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Among the Japanese general population, diabetes confers an increased risk of all-cause death. Particular attention must be paid to the pronounced high mortality in diabetes accompanied with leanness, regardless of age.

Duke Scholars

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Published In

Diabetes Care

DOI

EISSN

1935-5548

Publication Date

May 2013

Volume

36

Issue

5

Start / End Page

1186 / 1192

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Thinness
  • Prospective Studies
  • Obesity
  • Neoplasms
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • Diabetes Mellitus
 

Citation

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Yano, Y., Kario, K., Ishikawa, S., Ojima, T., Gotoh, T., Kayaba, K., … JMS Cohort Study Group, . (2013). Associations between diabetes, leanness, and the risk of death in the Japanese general population: the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study. Diabetes Care, 36(5), 1186–1192. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc12-1736
Yano, Yuichiro, Kazuomi Kario, Shizukiyo Ishikawa, Toshiyuki Ojima, Tadao Gotoh, Kazunori Kayaba, Akizumi Tsutsumi, et al. “Associations between diabetes, leanness, and the risk of death in the Japanese general population: the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study.Diabetes Care 36, no. 5 (May 2013): 1186–92. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc12-1736.
Yano Y, Kario K, Ishikawa S, Ojima T, Gotoh T, Kayaba K, et al. Associations between diabetes, leanness, and the risk of death in the Japanese general population: the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study. Diabetes Care. 2013 May;36(5):1186–92.
Yano, Yuichiro, et al. “Associations between diabetes, leanness, and the risk of death in the Japanese general population: the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study.Diabetes Care, vol. 36, no. 5, May 2013, pp. 1186–92. Pubmed, doi:10.2337/dc12-1736.
Yano Y, Kario K, Ishikawa S, Ojima T, Gotoh T, Kayaba K, Tsutsumi A, Shimada K, Nakamura Y, Kajii E, JMS Cohort Study Group. Associations between diabetes, leanness, and the risk of death in the Japanese general population: the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study. Diabetes Care. 2013 May;36(5):1186–1192.

Published In

Diabetes Care

DOI

EISSN

1935-5548

Publication Date

May 2013

Volume

36

Issue

5

Start / End Page

1186 / 1192

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Thinness
  • Prospective Studies
  • Obesity
  • Neoplasms
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • Diabetes Mellitus