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Counting Steps: A New Way to Monitor Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Sehgal, S; Chowdhury, A; Rabih, F; Gadre, A; Park, MM; Li, M; Wang, X; Highland, KB ...
Published in: Lung
August 2019

RATIONALE: Activity levels in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have correlated with surrogate markers of disease severity. It is not known whether physical activity measures are useful in monitoring patients with PAH. OBJECTIVES: This pilot study aimed to evaluate whether change in physical activity measured by an accelerometer correlates with changes in six-minute walk distance (6MWD), echocardiographic parameters, NT-proBNP, or health-related quality-of-life measures (HRQOL). METHODS: The study design was a prospective, observational study in subjects with prevalent PAH. Subjects wore a wrist-worn accelerometer (Fitbit Charge HR®) between two outpatient visits. Daily step count and activity levels were recorded, and the change over time was correlated with changes in 6MWD, echocardiographic parameters, HRQOL, and NT-proBNP. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: 30 subjects were enrolled, of which 20 patients had adequate accelerometer data to be analyzed over the study duration. The mean duration of follow-up was 136.4 ( ± 47.3) days. The change in daily step count correlated with a change in 6MWD (r 0.43, p 0.05). Changes in duration spent in moderately active (r 0.52, p 0.02), lightly active (r 0.48, p 0.05), and sedentary activity levels (r - 0.54, p 0.02) correlated with a change in HRQOL. Changes in activity levels did not correlate with echocardiographic measures or NT-pro BNP. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in daily step count and time spent at fairly active, lightly active, and sedentary activity levels correlate with changes in 6MWD, and HRQOL in subjects with PAH suggesting that accelerometry may be a useful monitoring tool.

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Published In

Lung

DOI

EISSN

1432-1750

Publication Date

August 2019

Volume

197

Issue

4

Start / End Page

501 / 508

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Walking
  • Walk Test
  • Time Factors
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Sedentary Behavior
  • Respiratory System
  • Quality of Life
  • Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
  • Prospective Studies
  • Predictive Value of Tests
 

Citation

APA
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ICMJE
MLA
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Sehgal, S., Chowdhury, A., Rabih, F., Gadre, A., Park, M. M., Li, M., … STep-count using an Accelerometer for Monitoring PAH—STAMP Study group, . (2019). Counting Steps: A New Way to Monitor Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Lung, 197(4), 501–508. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00408-019-00239-y
Sehgal, Sameep, Ananda Chowdhury, Fadi Rabih, Abhishek Gadre, Margaret M. Park, Manshi Li, Xiaofeng Wang, Kristin B. Highland, and Kristin B. STep-count using an Accelerometer for Monitoring PAH—STAMP Study group. “Counting Steps: A New Way to Monitor Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.Lung 197, no. 4 (August 2019): 501–8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00408-019-00239-y.
Sehgal S, Chowdhury A, Rabih F, Gadre A, Park MM, Li M, et al. Counting Steps: A New Way to Monitor Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Lung. 2019 Aug;197(4):501–8.
Sehgal, Sameep, et al. “Counting Steps: A New Way to Monitor Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.Lung, vol. 197, no. 4, Aug. 2019, pp. 501–08. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00408-019-00239-y.
Sehgal S, Chowdhury A, Rabih F, Gadre A, Park MM, Li M, Wang X, Highland KB, STep-count using an Accelerometer for Monitoring PAH—STAMP Study group. Counting Steps: A New Way to Monitor Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Lung. 2019 Aug;197(4):501–508.
Journal cover image

Published In

Lung

DOI

EISSN

1432-1750

Publication Date

August 2019

Volume

197

Issue

4

Start / End Page

501 / 508

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Walking
  • Walk Test
  • Time Factors
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Sedentary Behavior
  • Respiratory System
  • Quality of Life
  • Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
  • Prospective Studies
  • Predictive Value of Tests