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The cost-effectiveness of treating childhood cancer in 4 centers across sub-Saharan Africa.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Githang'a, J; Brown, B; Chitsike, I; Schroeder, K; Chekwenda-Makore, N; Majahasi, F; Ogundoyin, O; Renner, L; Petricca, K; Denburg, AE ...
Published in: Cancer
March 2021

The treatment of childhood cancer often is assumed to be costly in African settings, thereby limiting advocacy and policy efforts. The authors determined the cost and cost-effectiveness of maintaining childhood cancer centers across 4 hospitals throughout sub-Saharan Africa.Within hospitals representing 4 countries (Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe), cost was determined either retrospectively or prospectively for all inputs related to operating a pediatric cancer unit (eg, laboratory costs, medications, and salaries). Cost-effectiveness was calculated based on the annual number of newly diagnosed patients, survival rates, and life expectancy.Cost per new diagnosis ranged from $2400 to $31,000, attributable to variances with regard to center size, case mix, drug prices, admission practices, and the treatment abandonment rate, which also affected survival. The most expensive cost input was found to be associated with medication in Kenya, and medical personnel in the other 3 centers. The cost per disability-adjusted life-year averted ranged from 0.3 to 3.6 times the per capita gross national income. Childhood cancer treatment therefore was considered to be very cost-effective by World Health Organization standards in 2 countries and cost-effective in 1 additional country. In all centers, abandonment of treatment was common; modeling exercises suggested that public funding of treatment, additional psychosocial personnel, and modifications of inpatient policies would increase survival rates while maintaining or even improving cost-effectiveness.Across various African countries, childhood cancer treatment units represent cost-effective interventions. Cost-effectiveness can be increased through the control of drug prices, appropriate policy environments, and decreasing the rate of treatment abandonment. These results will inform national childhood cancer strategies across Africa.

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Published In

Cancer

DOI

EISSN

1097-0142

ISSN

0008-543X

Publication Date

March 2021

Volume

127

Issue

5

Start / End Page

787 / 793

Related Subject Headings

  • Oncology & Carcinogenesis
  • Neoplasms
  • Humans
  • Health Care Costs
  • Drug Costs
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Africa South of the Sahara
  • 4206 Public health
  • 3211 Oncology and carcinogenesis
  • 1117 Public Health and Health Services
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
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Githang’a, J., Brown, B., Chitsike, I., Schroeder, K., Chekwenda-Makore, N., Majahasi, F., … Gupta, S. (2021). The cost-effectiveness of treating childhood cancer in 4 centers across sub-Saharan Africa. Cancer, 127(5), 787–793. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.33280
Githang’a, Jessie, Biobele Brown, Inam Chitsike, Kristin Schroeder, Nester Chekwenda-Makore, Flora Majahasi, Olakayode Ogundoyin, et al. “The cost-effectiveness of treating childhood cancer in 4 centers across sub-Saharan Africa.Cancer 127, no. 5 (March 2021): 787–93. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.33280.
Githang’a J, Brown B, Chitsike I, Schroeder K, Chekwenda-Makore N, Majahasi F, et al. The cost-effectiveness of treating childhood cancer in 4 centers across sub-Saharan Africa. Cancer. 2021 Mar;127(5):787–93.
Githang’a, Jessie, et al. “The cost-effectiveness of treating childhood cancer in 4 centers across sub-Saharan Africa.Cancer, vol. 127, no. 5, Mar. 2021, pp. 787–93. Epmc, doi:10.1002/cncr.33280.
Githang’a J, Brown B, Chitsike I, Schroeder K, Chekwenda-Makore N, Majahasi F, Ogundoyin O, Renner L, Petricca K, Denburg AE, Horton SE, Gupta S. The cost-effectiveness of treating childhood cancer in 4 centers across sub-Saharan Africa. Cancer. 2021 Mar;127(5):787–793.
Journal cover image

Published In

Cancer

DOI

EISSN

1097-0142

ISSN

0008-543X

Publication Date

March 2021

Volume

127

Issue

5

Start / End Page

787 / 793

Related Subject Headings

  • Oncology & Carcinogenesis
  • Neoplasms
  • Humans
  • Health Care Costs
  • Drug Costs
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Africa South of the Sahara
  • 4206 Public health
  • 3211 Oncology and carcinogenesis
  • 1117 Public Health and Health Services