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Motivation to recover for adolescent and adult eating disorder patients in residential treatment.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Manwaring, J; Blalock, DV; Le Grange, D; Duffy, A; McClanahan, SF; Johnson, C; Mehler, PS; Plotkin, M; Rienecke, RD
Published in: Eur Eat Disord Rev
July 2021

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess how baseline motivation to recover impacts eating disorder (ED) and comorbid symptoms at end-of-treatment (EOT) for adolescents and adults in inpatient/residential treatment. METHOD: Two hundred and three adolescent (M = 15.90) and 395 adult (M = 25.45) patients with a Diagnostic Statistical Manual, 5th edition ED diagnosis completed the Decisional Balance Scale (DBS) at baseline, and psychosocial measures (ED symptoms, anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms), and %body mass index (kg/m2 ; BMI) or median %BMI (for adolescents) at baseline and EOT. RESULTS: The DBS Avoidance Coping and Burdens subscales at baseline were significantly lower for adolescents than adults (p < 0.001), whereas the DBS Benefits subscale at baseline did not significantly differ between subsamples (p = 0.06). Motivation to recover via DBS subscales was a more reliable predictor of EOT outcomes for both ED and comorbid psychopathology in adults (significant predictor in 19 of 54 total analyses, and 4 significant associations post-Bonferroni correction) than adolescents (significant predictor in 5 of 54 total analyses, and 1 significant association post-Bonferroni correction). CONCLUSIONS: Baseline motivation to recover may be an important predictor of outcome for adult patients in inpatient/residential treatment but does not appear associated with outcomes for adolescent patients.

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Published In

Eur Eat Disord Rev

DOI

EISSN

1099-0968

Publication Date

July 2021

Volume

29

Issue

4

Start / End Page

622 / 633

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Residential Treatment
  • Psychopathology
  • Motivation
  • Humans
  • Feeding and Eating Disorders
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Anxiety
  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • 5203 Clinical and health psychology
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Manwaring, J., Blalock, D. V., Le Grange, D., Duffy, A., McClanahan, S. F., Johnson, C., … Rienecke, R. D. (2021). Motivation to recover for adolescent and adult eating disorder patients in residential treatment. Eur Eat Disord Rev, 29(4), 622–633. https://doi.org/10.1002/erv.2828
Manwaring, Jamie, Dan V. Blalock, Daniel Le Grange, Alan Duffy, Susan F. McClanahan, Craig Johnson, Philip S. Mehler, Millie Plotkin, and Renee D. Rienecke. “Motivation to recover for adolescent and adult eating disorder patients in residential treatment.Eur Eat Disord Rev 29, no. 4 (July 2021): 622–33. https://doi.org/10.1002/erv.2828.
Manwaring J, Blalock DV, Le Grange D, Duffy A, McClanahan SF, Johnson C, et al. Motivation to recover for adolescent and adult eating disorder patients in residential treatment. Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2021 Jul;29(4):622–33.
Manwaring, Jamie, et al. “Motivation to recover for adolescent and adult eating disorder patients in residential treatment.Eur Eat Disord Rev, vol. 29, no. 4, July 2021, pp. 622–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/erv.2828.
Manwaring J, Blalock DV, Le Grange D, Duffy A, McClanahan SF, Johnson C, Mehler PS, Plotkin M, Rienecke RD. Motivation to recover for adolescent and adult eating disorder patients in residential treatment. Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2021 Jul;29(4):622–633.
Journal cover image

Published In

Eur Eat Disord Rev

DOI

EISSN

1099-0968

Publication Date

July 2021

Volume

29

Issue

4

Start / End Page

622 / 633

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Residential Treatment
  • Psychopathology
  • Motivation
  • Humans
  • Feeding and Eating Disorders
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Anxiety
  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • 5203 Clinical and health psychology