Skip to main content

Depression, chronic pain, and high-impact chronic pain among cancer survivors.

Publication ,  Conference
Osazuwa-Peters, N; Polednik, KM; Tutlam, NT; Tait, R; Scherrer, J; Barnes, JM; Schootman, M; Adjei Boakye, E
Published in: Journal of Clinical Oncology
May 20, 2021

12085 Background: The majority of the 17 million individuals living with a cancer diagnosis in the United States have experienced pain, either from the disease itself or from its treatment. Pain negatively impacts psychosocial quality of life and is associated with poorer overall outcome. However, the impact of pain on daily living differ among cancer survivors, and there is a paucity of research on chronic pain, especially high-impact chronic pain (HICP) in this growing population. We estimated the prevalence of chronic pain, and HICP among cancer survivors, and described the association between depression and these outcomes. Methods: This study used data from the 2015-2017 National Health Interview Survey. Outcomes of interest were chronic pain, defined as pain on most days or every day in the past six months, and HICP, defined as chronic pain that limited life or work activities on most days or every day during the past six months. Weighted, adjusted multivariable logistic regressions estimated association between depression and chronic pain and HICP among cancer survivors, while controlling for age, gender, marital status, education, employment, health insurance, smoking status, number of doctor’s visit, general health, and comorbidities. Results: Among 49,326 survey respondents, 11.7% (n = 5,335) had a cancer diagnosis. An estimated 43.6% of cancer survivors reported chronic pain; and 19.2% reported HICP. We found an association between depression and both chronic pain and HICP in unadjusted analyses. In the adjusted models, cancer survivors depressed within the last month had more than double the odds of reporting both chronic pain (aOR = 2.32; 95% CI 1.75, 3.07) and HICP (aOR = 2.12; 95% CI 1.50, 3.01). Other factors associated with both chronic pain and HICP among cancer survivors included being a current smoker (aOR = 1.63; 95% CI 1.14, 2.34; aOR = 1.83; 95% CI 1.18, 2.84) and being unemployed (aOR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.10,1.90; aOR = 3.10; 95% CI: 2.00−4.81). Cancer survivors with ≥2 comorbidities also had 55% increased odds of reporting chronic pain (aOR = 1.55; 95% CI 1.17,2.04) compared with those without comorbidities. Conclusions: Over 40% of cancer survivors may have a history of chronic pain, and survivors reporting being depressed are significantly more likely to report both chronic pain and HICP. The association between depression and pain in cancer survivors calls for personalized management of chronic pain, especially in cancer survivors with a history of depression.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Journal of Clinical Oncology

DOI

EISSN

1527-7755

ISSN

0732-183X

Publication Date

May 20, 2021

Volume

39

Issue

15_suppl

Start / End Page

12085 / 12085

Publisher

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

Related Subject Headings

  • Oncology & Carcinogenesis
  • 3211 Oncology and carcinogenesis
  • 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis
  • 1103 Clinical Sciences
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Osazuwa-Peters, N., Polednik, K. M., Tutlam, N. T., Tait, R., Scherrer, J., Barnes, J. M., … Adjei Boakye, E. (2021). Depression, chronic pain, and high-impact chronic pain among cancer survivors. In Journal of Clinical Oncology (Vol. 39, pp. 12085–12085). American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2021.39.15_suppl.12085
Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba, Katherine M. Polednik, Nhial T. Tutlam, Raymond Tait, Jeffrey Scherrer, Justin Michael Barnes, Mario Schootman, and Eric Adjei Boakye. “Depression, chronic pain, and high-impact chronic pain among cancer survivors.” In Journal of Clinical Oncology, 39:12085–12085. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2021. https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2021.39.15_suppl.12085.
Osazuwa-Peters N, Polednik KM, Tutlam NT, Tait R, Scherrer J, Barnes JM, et al. Depression, chronic pain, and high-impact chronic pain among cancer survivors. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO); 2021. p. 12085–12085.
Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba, et al. “Depression, chronic pain, and high-impact chronic pain among cancer survivors.Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 39, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2021, pp. 12085–12085. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2021.39.15_suppl.12085.
Osazuwa-Peters N, Polednik KM, Tutlam NT, Tait R, Scherrer J, Barnes JM, Schootman M, Adjei Boakye E. Depression, chronic pain, and high-impact chronic pain among cancer survivors. Journal of Clinical Oncology. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO); 2021. p. 12085–12085.

Published In

Journal of Clinical Oncology

DOI

EISSN

1527-7755

ISSN

0732-183X

Publication Date

May 20, 2021

Volume

39

Issue

15_suppl

Start / End Page

12085 / 12085

Publisher

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

Related Subject Headings

  • Oncology & Carcinogenesis
  • 3211 Oncology and carcinogenesis
  • 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis
  • 1103 Clinical Sciences