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Oldest-old mortality in China

Publication ,  Journal Article
Yi, Z; Vaupel, JW
Published in: Demographic Research
April 18, 2003

We find that the Kannisto model, a two-parameter logistic formula, fits Han Chinese death rates at oldest-old ages better than the Gompertz and four other models. Chinese death rates appear to be roughly similar to Swedish and Japanese rates after age 97 for both males and females. Because reports of age seem to be serviceably reliable up to age 100 and perhaps age 105 in China, we think that this convergence may be mainly due to mortality selection in the heterogeneous Chinese population. We show that in China, as in developed countries, the rate of increase in mortality with age decelerates at very old ages. © 2003 Max-Planck-Gesellschaft.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Demographic Research

DOI

ISSN

1435-9871

Publication Date

April 18, 2003

Volume

8

Start / End Page

215 / 244

Related Subject Headings

  • Demography
  • 1603 Demography
 

Citation

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ICMJE
MLA
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Yi, Z., & Vaupel, J. W. (2003). Oldest-old mortality in China. Demographic Research, 8, 215–244. https://doi.org/10.4054/demres.2003.8.7
Yi, Z., and J. W. Vaupel. “Oldest-old mortality in China.” Demographic Research 8 (April 18, 2003): 215–44. https://doi.org/10.4054/demres.2003.8.7.
Yi Z, Vaupel JW. Oldest-old mortality in China. Demographic Research. 2003 Apr 18;8:215–44.
Yi, Z., and J. W. Vaupel. “Oldest-old mortality in China.” Demographic Research, vol. 8, Apr. 2003, pp. 215–44. Scopus, doi:10.4054/demres.2003.8.7.
Yi Z, Vaupel JW. Oldest-old mortality in China. Demographic Research. 2003 Apr 18;8:215–244.

Published In

Demographic Research

DOI

ISSN

1435-9871

Publication Date

April 18, 2003

Volume

8

Start / End Page

215 / 244

Related Subject Headings

  • Demography
  • 1603 Demography