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Relation between reversal of diastolic creep and recovery of systolic function after ischemic myocardial injury in conscious dogs.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Glower, DD; Schaper, J; Kabas, JS; Hoffmeister, HM; Schaper, W; Spratt, JA; Davis, JW; Rankin, JS
Published in: Circ Res
June 1987

Although prolonged functional abnormalities after transient myocardial ischemia have been well described, the interrelationship between postischemic systolic and diastolic alterations remains controversial. Therefore, 24 chronically instrumented conscious dogs were studied with left ventricular and pleural micromanometers, ultrasonic dimension transducers in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary distribution, and vena caval and coronary artery occluders. The LAD was occluded for 15 minutes and reperfused for 24 hours while vena caval occlusions were performed at intervals to measure myocardial segment length at 0 mm Hg transmural diastolic left ventricular pressure (L0). Coronary occlusion produced an immediate fall in systolic function as assessed by ejection shortening and stroke work and also induced a 16 +/- 4% increase in L0, which was termed diastolic creep. Throughout reperfusion, reversal of diastolic abnormalities correlated strongly with recovery of segmental shortening and stroke work (p less than 0.001). Correlation between systolic dysfunction and diastolic creep was also observed during alteration of inotropic state by dopamine, during initial reperfusion hyperfunction, and during pharmacologic manipulation of afterload. In 5 additional dog hearts fixed in diastole by rapid glutaraldehyde infusion after coronary occlusion, myocardial creep measured by the segment length transducers paralleled sarcomere elongation measured by electron microscopy. Thus, the direct correlation between diastolic creep and systolic dysfunction throughout reperfusion and during hemodynamic alterations suggests that diastolic properties of postischemic myocardium may not be entirely passive and that systolic and diastolic dysfunction induced by ischemia may have a common basis at the cellular level.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Circ Res

DOI

ISSN

0009-7330

Publication Date

June 1987

Volume

60

Issue

6

Start / End Page

850 / 860

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Time Factors
  • Stroke Volume
  • Perfusion
  • Myocardium
  • Myocardial Contraction
  • Heart Rate
  • Dopamine
  • Dogs
  • Diastole
  • Coronary Disease
 

Citation

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MLA
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Glower, D. D., Schaper, J., Kabas, J. S., Hoffmeister, H. M., Schaper, W., Spratt, J. A., … Rankin, J. S. (1987). Relation between reversal of diastolic creep and recovery of systolic function after ischemic myocardial injury in conscious dogs. Circ Res, 60(6), 850–860. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.res.60.6.850
Glower, D. D., J. Schaper, J. S. Kabas, H. M. Hoffmeister, W. Schaper, J. A. Spratt, J. W. Davis, and J. S. Rankin. “Relation between reversal of diastolic creep and recovery of systolic function after ischemic myocardial injury in conscious dogs.Circ Res 60, no. 6 (June 1987): 850–60. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.res.60.6.850.
Glower DD, Schaper J, Kabas JS, Hoffmeister HM, Schaper W, Spratt JA, et al. Relation between reversal of diastolic creep and recovery of systolic function after ischemic myocardial injury in conscious dogs. Circ Res. 1987 Jun;60(6):850–60.
Glower, D. D., et al. “Relation between reversal of diastolic creep and recovery of systolic function after ischemic myocardial injury in conscious dogs.Circ Res, vol. 60, no. 6, June 1987, pp. 850–60. Pubmed, doi:10.1161/01.res.60.6.850.
Glower DD, Schaper J, Kabas JS, Hoffmeister HM, Schaper W, Spratt JA, Davis JW, Rankin JS. Relation between reversal of diastolic creep and recovery of systolic function after ischemic myocardial injury in conscious dogs. Circ Res. 1987 Jun;60(6):850–860.

Published In

Circ Res

DOI

ISSN

0009-7330

Publication Date

June 1987

Volume

60

Issue

6

Start / End Page

850 / 860

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Time Factors
  • Stroke Volume
  • Perfusion
  • Myocardium
  • Myocardial Contraction
  • Heart Rate
  • Dopamine
  • Dogs
  • Diastole
  • Coronary Disease