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Denatured muscle as a nerve conduit: a functional, morphologic, and electrophysiologic evaluation.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Chen, LE; Seaber, AV; Urbaniak, JR; Murrell, GA
Published in: J Reconstr Microsurg
May 1994

This experimental study evaluated denatured skeletal muscle and denatured epineural basement membrane tube as conduits to bridge defects in rat sciatic nerve. A 1-cm segment of sciatic nerve was resected in 48 rats. In Group I (control), the segment was discarded; in Group 2, the segment was reimplanted orthotopically; in Group 3, the defect was bridged by denatured (liquid nitrogen frozen and thawed) muscle; and in Group 4, the resected nerve segment was denatured as in Group 3, the axons removed, and the resulting epineural basement membrane tube used as a conduit. Functional assessment was carried out with the sciatic functional index (SFI). Histologic examination of the graft was made at 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. At 6 months, a Grass neurostimulator was used to determine the minimal voltage necessary to elicit ankle motion. Hind-foot ulceration and/or toe loss occurred in all groups, but less commonly in the rats with denatured muscle and denatured nerve conduits. Both Groups 3 and 4 achieved a macroscopic appearance of nerve at 45 days. However, the denatured conduits were longer and narrower than in standard nerve grafts. In the distal nerve, a mixture of axonal regeneration and degeneration was seen in Groups 2 to 4. By 6 months, the microscopic appearance of the nerve grafts, conduits, and distal nerves was that of normal nerve, with no differences between the groups. Active plantar flexion following electrical stimulation was observed in Groups 2 to 4 at 6 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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Published In

J Reconstr Microsurg

DOI

ISSN

0743-684X

Publication Date

May 1994

Volume

10

Issue

3

Start / End Page

137 / 144

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Surgery
  • Sciatic Nerve
  • Rats, Sprague-Dawley
  • Rats
  • Protein Denaturation
  • Peripheral Nerves
  • Peripheral Nerve Injuries
  • Neurites
  • Nerve Transfer
  • Nerve Regeneration
 

Citation

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Chen, L. E., Seaber, A. V., Urbaniak, J. R., & Murrell, G. A. (1994). Denatured muscle as a nerve conduit: a functional, morphologic, and electrophysiologic evaluation. J Reconstr Microsurg, 10(3), 137–144. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-1006579
Chen, L. E., A. V. Seaber, J. R. Urbaniak, and G. A. Murrell. “Denatured muscle as a nerve conduit: a functional, morphologic, and electrophysiologic evaluation.J Reconstr Microsurg 10, no. 3 (May 1994): 137–44. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-1006579.
Chen LE, Seaber AV, Urbaniak JR, Murrell GA. Denatured muscle as a nerve conduit: a functional, morphologic, and electrophysiologic evaluation. J Reconstr Microsurg. 1994 May;10(3):137–44.
Chen, L. E., et al. “Denatured muscle as a nerve conduit: a functional, morphologic, and electrophysiologic evaluation.J Reconstr Microsurg, vol. 10, no. 3, May 1994, pp. 137–44. Pubmed, doi:10.1055/s-2007-1006579.
Chen LE, Seaber AV, Urbaniak JR, Murrell GA. Denatured muscle as a nerve conduit: a functional, morphologic, and electrophysiologic evaluation. J Reconstr Microsurg. 1994 May;10(3):137–144.
Journal cover image

Published In

J Reconstr Microsurg

DOI

ISSN

0743-684X

Publication Date

May 1994

Volume

10

Issue

3

Start / End Page

137 / 144

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Surgery
  • Sciatic Nerve
  • Rats, Sprague-Dawley
  • Rats
  • Protein Denaturation
  • Peripheral Nerves
  • Peripheral Nerve Injuries
  • Neurites
  • Nerve Transfer
  • Nerve Regeneration