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From the Johns Hopkins Baby to Baby Miller: what have we learned from four decades of reflection on neonatal cases?

Publication ,  Journal Article
Paris, JJ; Ferranti, J; Reardon, F
Published in: The Journal of clinical ethics
January 2001

Duke Scholars

Published In

The Journal of clinical ethics

EISSN

1945-5879

ISSN

1046-7890

Publication Date

January 2001

Volume

12

Issue

3

Start / End Page

207 / 214

Related Subject Headings

  • Withholding Treatment
  • United States
  • Treatment Refusal
  • Third-Party Consent
  • Quality of Life
  • Professional Autonomy
  • Parents
  • Parental Consent
  • Morals
  • Medical Futility
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Paris, J. J., Ferranti, J., & Reardon, F. (2001). From the Johns Hopkins Baby to Baby Miller: what have we learned from four decades of reflection on neonatal cases? The Journal of Clinical Ethics, 12(3), 207–214.
Paris, J. J., J. Ferranti, and F. Reardon. “From the Johns Hopkins Baby to Baby Miller: what have we learned from four decades of reflection on neonatal cases?The Journal of Clinical Ethics 12, no. 3 (January 2001): 207–14.
Paris JJ, Ferranti J, Reardon F. From the Johns Hopkins Baby to Baby Miller: what have we learned from four decades of reflection on neonatal cases? The Journal of clinical ethics. 2001 Jan;12(3):207–14.
Paris, J. J., et al. “From the Johns Hopkins Baby to Baby Miller: what have we learned from four decades of reflection on neonatal cases?The Journal of Clinical Ethics, vol. 12, no. 3, Jan. 2001, pp. 207–14.
Paris JJ, Ferranti J, Reardon F. From the Johns Hopkins Baby to Baby Miller: what have we learned from four decades of reflection on neonatal cases? The Journal of clinical ethics. 2001 Jan;12(3):207–214.

Published In

The Journal of clinical ethics

EISSN

1945-5879

ISSN

1046-7890

Publication Date

January 2001

Volume

12

Issue

3

Start / End Page

207 / 214

Related Subject Headings

  • Withholding Treatment
  • United States
  • Treatment Refusal
  • Third-Party Consent
  • Quality of Life
  • Professional Autonomy
  • Parents
  • Parental Consent
  • Morals
  • Medical Futility