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The Tuskegee Legacy Project: willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Katz, RV; Kegeles, SS; Kressin, NR; Green, BL; Wang, MQ; James, SA; Russell, SL; Claudio, C
Published in: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
November 2006

The broad goal of the Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) study was to address, and understand, a range of issues related to the recruitment and retention of Blacks and other minorities in biomedical research studies. The specific aim of this analysis was to compare the self-reported willingness of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites to participate as research subjects in biomedical studies, as measured by the Likelihood of Participation (LOP) Scale and the Guinea Pig Fear Factor (GPFF) Scale. The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire, a 60 item instrument, was administered to 1,133 adult Blacks, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic Whites in 4 U.S. cities. The findings revealed no difference in self-reported willingness to participate in biomedical research, as measured by the LOP Scale, between Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites, despite Blacks being 1.8 times as likely as Whites to have a higher fear of participation in biomedical research on the GPFF Scale.

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Published In

Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

DOI

EISSN

1548-6869

ISSN

1049-2089

Publication Date

November 2006

Volume

17

Issue

4

Start / End Page

698 / 715

Related Subject Headings

  • Urban Population
  • Research Subjects
  • Public Health
  • Personnel Selection
  • Minority Groups
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Fear
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Katz, R. V., Kegeles, S. S., Kressin, N. R., Green, B. L., Wang, M. Q., James, S. A., … Claudio, C. (2006). The Tuskegee Legacy Project: willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 17(4), 698–715. https://doi.org/10.1353/hpu.2006.0126
Katz, Ralph V., S Steven Kegeles, Nancy R. Kressin, B Lee Green, Min Qi Wang, Sherman A. James, Stefanie Luise Russell, and Cristina Claudio. “The Tuskegee Legacy Project: willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research.Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 17, no. 4 (November 2006): 698–715. https://doi.org/10.1353/hpu.2006.0126.
Katz RV, Kegeles SS, Kressin NR, Green BL, Wang MQ, James SA, et al. The Tuskegee Legacy Project: willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2006 Nov;17(4):698–715.
Katz, Ralph V., et al. “The Tuskegee Legacy Project: willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research.Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, vol. 17, no. 4, Nov. 2006, pp. 698–715. Epmc, doi:10.1353/hpu.2006.0126.
Katz RV, Kegeles SS, Kressin NR, Green BL, Wang MQ, James SA, Russell SL, Claudio C. The Tuskegee Legacy Project: willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2006 Nov;17(4):698–715.
Journal cover image

Published In

Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

DOI

EISSN

1548-6869

ISSN

1049-2089

Publication Date

November 2006

Volume

17

Issue

4

Start / End Page

698 / 715

Related Subject Headings

  • Urban Population
  • Research Subjects
  • Public Health
  • Personnel Selection
  • Minority Groups
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Fear