Skip to main content
construction release_alert
Scholars@Duke will be undergoing maintenance April 11-15. Some features may be unavailable during this time.
cancel

Prevalence of chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms in seroprevalent children with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in the United States.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Singh, KK; Barroga, CF; Hughes, MD; Chen, J; Raskino, C; McKinney, RE; Spector, SA
Published in: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
March 1, 2004

Several chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in HIV-1 infection, disease progression, and transmission. We studied the prevalence of genetic variations in CCR2, SDF1, and the CCR5 gene and its promoter region at positions 59029, 59353, and 59356 in a seroprevalent cohort of 1057 children with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in the United States. The percentage of children with the CCR5-wt/Delta32 genotype was significantly higher for white, non-Hispanic children (15%) than for Hispanic (6%) or black, non-Hispanic children (4%). For the CCR5-59029-G/A, CCR5-59353-T/C, and CCR5-59356-C/T polymorphisms, there were significant or marginally significant differences in genotype frequencies across race/ethnicity groups. For the CCR2-wt/64I polymorphism, both black, non-Hispanic and Hispanic children had a higher frequency of the CCR2-wt/64I genotype (24% and 21%, respectively) and CCR2-64I/64I genotype (4% and 3%, respectively) than white, non-Hispanic children (14% and 2%, respectively). For the SDF1-3'-G/A polymorphism, black, non-Hispanic children had a lower combined frequency of the SDF1-3'-G/A and SDF1-3'-A/A genotypes (15%) than did Hispanic children (33%) and white, non-Hispanic children (37%). These analyses show that the distribution of chemokine receptor and chemokine genetic polymorphisms varies significantly across race/ethnicity subgroups of HIV-1-infected children in the United States.

Duke Scholars

Published In

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr

DOI

ISSN

1525-4135

Publication Date

March 1, 2004

Volume

35

Issue

3

Start / End Page

309 / 313

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Virology
  • United States
  • Seroepidemiologic Studies
  • Receptors, Chemokine
  • Humans
  • HIV Infections
  • Genotype
  • Genetic Variation
  • Child
  • Chemokines
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Singh, K. K., Barroga, C. F., Hughes, M. D., Chen, J., Raskino, C., McKinney, R. E., & Spector, S. A. (2004). Prevalence of chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms in seroprevalent children with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in the United States. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr, 35(3), 309–313. https://doi.org/10.1097/00126334-200403010-00013
Singh, Kumud K., Charlene F. Barroga, Michael D. Hughes, Jie Chen, Claire Raskino, Ross E. McKinney, and Stephen A. Spector. “Prevalence of chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms in seroprevalent children with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in the United States.J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 35, no. 3 (March 1, 2004): 309–13. https://doi.org/10.1097/00126334-200403010-00013.
Singh KK, Barroga CF, Hughes MD, Chen J, Raskino C, McKinney RE, et al. Prevalence of chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms in seroprevalent children with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in the United States. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2004 Mar 1;35(3):309–13.
Singh, Kumud K., et al. “Prevalence of chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms in seroprevalent children with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in the United States.J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr, vol. 35, no. 3, Mar. 2004, pp. 309–13. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/00126334-200403010-00013.
Singh KK, Barroga CF, Hughes MD, Chen J, Raskino C, McKinney RE, Spector SA. Prevalence of chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms in seroprevalent children with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in the United States. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2004 Mar 1;35(3):309–313.

Published In

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr

DOI

ISSN

1525-4135

Publication Date

March 1, 2004

Volume

35

Issue

3

Start / End Page

309 / 313

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Virology
  • United States
  • Seroepidemiologic Studies
  • Receptors, Chemokine
  • Humans
  • HIV Infections
  • Genotype
  • Genetic Variation
  • Child
  • Chemokines