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Pain, stiffness, and fatigue in juvenile polyarticular arthritis: contemporaneous stressful events and mood as predictors.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Schanberg, LE; Gil, KM; Anthony, KK; Yow, E; Rochon, J
Published in: Arthritis Rheum
April 2005

OBJECTIVE: To analyze patterns of stress, mood, disease symptoms, and activity reduction in children with polyarticular arthritis, using a prospective daily diary method. METHODS: For a 2-month period, 51 children with polyarticular arthritis (mean age 12.4 years, 65% female) completed daily diaries that included measures of symptoms of pain, stiffness, and fatigue, as well as stress, mood, and activity reduction. Functional status and disease activity were assessed at the initial and followup evaluations with use of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire, physician global assessment, joint count, and laboratory testing. RESULTS: Children reported having pain, stiffness, and fatigue on >70% of days, with significant variability in symptom levels. Results revealed significant same-day relationships between stress, mood, and disease symptoms, after controlling for covariates. Specifically, daily fluctuations in both stress and mood were predictive of increased pain, stiffness, and fatigue. Increases in daily stress, mood, and disease symptoms were also significantly related to decreased participation in social activities on a day-to-day basis. Only mood and stiffness were predictors of a cutback in school attendance. CONCLUSION: Stress and mood are important predictors of daily disease symptoms in children with polyarticular arthritis. Moreover, daily fluctuations in stress, mood, and disease symptoms are predictive of aspects of daily function, including participation in school and social activities. Thus, health care providers should solicit daily symptom reports when making decisions regarding clinical management. Nonpharmacologic interventions such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and stress management may be useful adjuvant therapy when treating the disease symptoms of children with polyarticular arthritis.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Arthritis Rheum

DOI

ISSN

0004-3591

Publication Date

April 2005

Volume

52

Issue

4

Start / End Page

1196 / 1204

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Stress, Psychological
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Range of Motion, Articular
  • Quality of Life
  • Pain
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Fatigue
  • Disease Progression
 

Citation

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Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Schanberg, L. E., Gil, K. M., Anthony, K. K., Yow, E., & Rochon, J. (2005). Pain, stiffness, and fatigue in juvenile polyarticular arthritis: contemporaneous stressful events and mood as predictors. Arthritis Rheum, 52(4), 1196–1204. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.20952
Schanberg, Laura E., Karen M. Gil, Kelly K. Anthony, Eric Yow, and James Rochon. “Pain, stiffness, and fatigue in juvenile polyarticular arthritis: contemporaneous stressful events and mood as predictors.Arthritis Rheum 52, no. 4 (April 2005): 1196–1204. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.20952.
Schanberg LE, Gil KM, Anthony KK, Yow E, Rochon J. Pain, stiffness, and fatigue in juvenile polyarticular arthritis: contemporaneous stressful events and mood as predictors. Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Apr;52(4):1196–204.
Schanberg, Laura E., et al. “Pain, stiffness, and fatigue in juvenile polyarticular arthritis: contemporaneous stressful events and mood as predictors.Arthritis Rheum, vol. 52, no. 4, Apr. 2005, pp. 1196–204. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/art.20952.
Schanberg LE, Gil KM, Anthony KK, Yow E, Rochon J. Pain, stiffness, and fatigue in juvenile polyarticular arthritis: contemporaneous stressful events and mood as predictors. Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Apr;52(4):1196–1204.
Journal cover image

Published In

Arthritis Rheum

DOI

ISSN

0004-3591

Publication Date

April 2005

Volume

52

Issue

4

Start / End Page

1196 / 1204

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Stress, Psychological
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Range of Motion, Articular
  • Quality of Life
  • Pain
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Fatigue
  • Disease Progression