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Exploring the "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: a follow-up study from the Tuskegee Legacy Project.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Katz, RV; Green, BL; Kressin, NR; James, SA; Wang, MQ; Claudio, C; Russell, SL
Published in: Journal of the National Medical Association
February 2009

The purpose of this follow-up 2003 3-City Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) Study was to validate or refute our prior findings from the 1999-2000 4 City TLP Study, which found no evidence to support the widely acknowledged "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS), ie, that blacks are reluctant to participate in biomedical studies due to their knowledge of the TSS. The TLP Questionnaire was administered in this random-digit-dial telephone survey to a stratified random sample of 1162 black, white, and Puerto Rican Hispanic adults in 3 different US cities. The findings from this current 3-City TLP Study fail to support the widely acknowledged "legacy" of the TSS, as awareness of the TSS was not statistically associated with the willingness to participate in biomedical studies. These findings, being in complete agreement with our previous findings from our 1999-2000 4-City TLP, validate those prior findings.

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Published In

Journal of the National Medical Association

DOI

EISSN

1943-4693

ISSN

0027-9684

Publication Date

February 2009

Volume

101

Issue

2

Start / End Page

179 / 183

Related Subject Headings

  • White People
  • Trust
  • Syphilis
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Researcher-Subject Relations
  • Research Subjects
  • Public Health
  • Prejudice
  • Patient Participation
  • Middle Aged
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Katz, R. V., Green, B. L., Kressin, N. R., James, S. A., Wang, M. Q., Claudio, C., & Russell, S. L. (2009). Exploring the "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: a follow-up study from the Tuskegee Legacy Project. Journal of the National Medical Association, 101(2), 179–183. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0027-9684(15)30833-6
Katz, Ralph V., B Lee Green, Nancy R. Kressin, Sherman A. James, Min Qi Wang, Cristina Claudio, and Stephanie Luise Russell. “Exploring the "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: a follow-up study from the Tuskegee Legacy Project.Journal of the National Medical Association 101, no. 2 (February 2009): 179–83. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0027-9684(15)30833-6.
Katz RV, Green BL, Kressin NR, James SA, Wang MQ, Claudio C, et al. Exploring the "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: a follow-up study from the Tuskegee Legacy Project. Journal of the National Medical Association. 2009 Feb;101(2):179–83.
Katz, Ralph V., et al. “Exploring the "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: a follow-up study from the Tuskegee Legacy Project.Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 101, no. 2, Feb. 2009, pp. 179–83. Epmc, doi:10.1016/s0027-9684(15)30833-6.
Katz RV, Green BL, Kressin NR, James SA, Wang MQ, Claudio C, Russell SL. Exploring the "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: a follow-up study from the Tuskegee Legacy Project. Journal of the National Medical Association. 2009 Feb;101(2):179–183.
Journal cover image

Published In

Journal of the National Medical Association

DOI

EISSN

1943-4693

ISSN

0027-9684

Publication Date

February 2009

Volume

101

Issue

2

Start / End Page

179 / 183

Related Subject Headings

  • White People
  • Trust
  • Syphilis
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Researcher-Subject Relations
  • Research Subjects
  • Public Health
  • Prejudice
  • Patient Participation
  • Middle Aged