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Screening for colorectal cancer. A comparison of 3 fecal occult blood tests.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Levin, B; Hess, K; Johnson, C
Published in: Archives of internal medicine
May 1997

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Fecal occult blood testing has become a standard screening test for large-bowel cancers in the average asymptomatic population. Performance characteristics of the test and physician and participant compliance are the 2 major elements that impact the success of screening and early detection.To evaluate the nonhydrated Hemoccult, rehydrated Hemoccult, and Hemoccult SENSA tests (SmithKline Diagnostics Inc, Palo Alto, Calif) and to assess participant and physician compliance.A mass community-based screening study in an urban setting. Kits were distributed by a local pharmacy and at community sites. Diagnostic tests were completed through physicians' offices and clinics. Participants were asymptomatic and aged 50 years or older. Those who tested positive were advised to follow up with a physician.An overall positivity rate of 16% was reported for the 8293 kits that were processed. Rehydrated Hemoccult had a positivity rate of 15%; Hemoccult SENSA, 7%; and nonhydrated Hemoccult, 5%. The positive predictive value of nonhydrated Hemoccult was 14%; rehydrated Hemoccult, 7%; and Hemoccult SENSA, 11%. Of those who tested positive, 59% had a colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy and double-contrast barium enema examination on follow-up. Recommended follow-up was more frequent for those who consulted a gastroenterologist.Rehydrated Hemoccult yielded a higher positivity rate and lower positive predictive value than either Hemoccult SENSA or nonhydrated Hemoccult. Hemoccult SENSA approached the positive predictive value of nonhydrated Hemoccult. Adequacy of follow-up of patients testing positive for fecal occult blood needs improvement.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Archives of internal medicine

DOI

EISSN

1538-3679

ISSN

0003-9926

Publication Date

May 1997

Volume

157

Issue

9

Start / End Page

970 / 976

Related Subject Headings

  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • Patient Compliance
  • Occult Blood
  • Middle Aged
  • Mass Screening
  • Male
  • Humans
  • General & Internal Medicine
  • Female
  • Colorectal Neoplasms
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Levin, B., Hess, K., & Johnson, C. (1997). Screening for colorectal cancer. A comparison of 3 fecal occult blood tests. Archives of Internal Medicine, 157(9), 970–976. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.1997.00440300064005
Levin, B., K. Hess, and C. Johnson. “Screening for colorectal cancer. A comparison of 3 fecal occult blood tests.Archives of Internal Medicine 157, no. 9 (May 1997): 970–76. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.1997.00440300064005.
Levin B, Hess K, Johnson C. Screening for colorectal cancer. A comparison of 3 fecal occult blood tests. Archives of internal medicine. 1997 May;157(9):970–6.
Levin, B., et al. “Screening for colorectal cancer. A comparison of 3 fecal occult blood tests.Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 157, no. 9, May 1997, pp. 970–76. Epmc, doi:10.1001/archinte.1997.00440300064005.
Levin B, Hess K, Johnson C. Screening for colorectal cancer. A comparison of 3 fecal occult blood tests. Archives of internal medicine. 1997 May;157(9):970–976.

Published In

Archives of internal medicine

DOI

EISSN

1538-3679

ISSN

0003-9926

Publication Date

May 1997

Volume

157

Issue

9

Start / End Page

970 / 976

Related Subject Headings

  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • Patient Compliance
  • Occult Blood
  • Middle Aged
  • Mass Screening
  • Male
  • Humans
  • General & Internal Medicine
  • Female
  • Colorectal Neoplasms