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Atypia in random periareolar fine-needle aspiration affects the decision of women at high risk to take tamoxifen for breast cancer chemoprevention.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Goldenberg, VK; Seewaldt, VL; Scott, V; Bean, GR; Broadwater, G; Fabian, C; Kimler, B; Zalles, C; Lipkus, IM
Published in: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
May 2007

Random periareolar fine-needle aspiration (RPFNA) is a research procedure designed to (a) evaluate short-term breast cancer risk in women at high risk for developing breast cancer, and (b) track response to chemoprevention. Of import, cellular atypia in breast RPFNA is prospectively associated with a 5.6-fold increase in breast cancer risk in women at high risk. Among 99 women attending a clinic for high-risk breast cancer, we explored the effects of RPFNA cytology results on decision making pertaining to the use of tamoxifen for breast cancer chemoprevention. No patient with nonproliferative or hyperplastic cytology subsequently elected to take tamoxifen. Only 7% of subjects with borderline atypia elected to take tamoxifen. In contrast, 50% with atypia elected to take tamoxifen. These results suggest that the provision of a biomarker of short-term risk can affect the motivation to take tamoxifen for chemoprevention. This conclusion is informative given that tamoxifen, due to its side effects, is often underused by women at high risk of developing breast cancer. Further research is needed to determine the mechanisms through which RPFNA results affect the decision to use tamoxifen, or any other breast cancer chemopreventive agent.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev

DOI

ISSN

1055-9965

Publication Date

May 2007

Volume

16

Issue

5

Start / End Page

1032 / 1034

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Tamoxifen
  • Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators
  • Risk Factors
  • Nipples
  • Middle Aged
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Epidemiology
  • Decision Making
  • Cohort Studies
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Goldenberg, V. K., Seewaldt, V. L., Scott, V., Bean, G. R., Broadwater, G., Fabian, C., … Lipkus, I. M. (2007). Atypia in random periareolar fine-needle aspiration affects the decision of women at high risk to take tamoxifen for breast cancer chemoprevention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 16(5), 1032–1034. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-0910
Goldenberg, Vanessa K., Victoria L. Seewaldt, Victoria Scott, Gregory R. Bean, Gloria Broadwater, Carol Fabian, Bruce Kimler, Carola Zalles, and Isaac M. Lipkus. “Atypia in random periareolar fine-needle aspiration affects the decision of women at high risk to take tamoxifen for breast cancer chemoprevention.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 16, no. 5 (May 2007): 1032–34. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-0910.
Goldenberg VK, Seewaldt VL, Scott V, Bean GR, Broadwater G, Fabian C, et al. Atypia in random periareolar fine-needle aspiration affects the decision of women at high risk to take tamoxifen for breast cancer chemoprevention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 May;16(5):1032–4.
Goldenberg, Vanessa K., et al. “Atypia in random periareolar fine-needle aspiration affects the decision of women at high risk to take tamoxifen for breast cancer chemoprevention.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, vol. 16, no. 5, May 2007, pp. 1032–34. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-0910.
Goldenberg VK, Seewaldt VL, Scott V, Bean GR, Broadwater G, Fabian C, Kimler B, Zalles C, Lipkus IM. Atypia in random periareolar fine-needle aspiration affects the decision of women at high risk to take tamoxifen for breast cancer chemoprevention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 May;16(5):1032–1034.

Published In

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev

DOI

ISSN

1055-9965

Publication Date

May 2007

Volume

16

Issue

5

Start / End Page

1032 / 1034

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Tamoxifen
  • Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators
  • Risk Factors
  • Nipples
  • Middle Aged
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Epidemiology
  • Decision Making
  • Cohort Studies