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Effects of sexual intercourse patterns in time to pregnancy studies.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Stanford, JB; Dunson, DB
Published in: American journal of epidemiology
May 2007

Time to pregnancy, typically defined as the number of menstrual cycles required to achieve a clinical pregnancy, is widely used as a measure of couple fecundity in epidemiologic studies. Time to pregnancy studies seldom utilize detailed data on the timing and frequency of sexual intercourse and the timing of ovulation. However, the simulated models in this paper illustrate that intercourse behavior can have a large impact on time to pregnancy and, likewise, on fecundability ratios, especially under conditions of low intercourse frequency or low fecundity. Because intercourse patterns in the menstrual cycles may vary substantially among groups, it is important to consider the effects of sexual behavior. Where relevant and feasible, an assessment should be made of the timing and frequency of intercourse relative to ovulation. Day-specific probabilities of pregnancy can be used to account for the effects of intercourse patterns. Depending on the research hypothesis, intercourse patterns may be considered as a potential confounder, mediator, or outcome.

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Published In

American journal of epidemiology

DOI

EISSN

1476-6256

ISSN

0002-9262

Publication Date

May 2007

Volume

165

Issue

9

Start / End Page

1088 / 1095

Related Subject Headings

  • Time Factors
  • Sexual Behavior
  • Probability
  • Pregnancy
  • Pilot Projects
  • Ovulation
  • Models, Biological
  • Menstrual Cycle
  • Humans
  • Fertilization
 

Citation

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Stanford, J. B., & Dunson, D. B. (2007). Effects of sexual intercourse patterns in time to pregnancy studies. American Journal of Epidemiology, 165(9), 1088–1095. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwk111
Stanford, Joseph B., and David B. Dunson. “Effects of sexual intercourse patterns in time to pregnancy studies.American Journal of Epidemiology 165, no. 9 (May 2007): 1088–95. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwk111.
Stanford JB, Dunson DB. Effects of sexual intercourse patterns in time to pregnancy studies. American journal of epidemiology. 2007 May;165(9):1088–95.
Stanford, Joseph B., and David B. Dunson. “Effects of sexual intercourse patterns in time to pregnancy studies.American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 165, no. 9, May 2007, pp. 1088–95. Epmc, doi:10.1093/aje/kwk111.
Stanford JB, Dunson DB. Effects of sexual intercourse patterns in time to pregnancy studies. American journal of epidemiology. 2007 May;165(9):1088–1095.
Journal cover image

Published In

American journal of epidemiology

DOI

EISSN

1476-6256

ISSN

0002-9262

Publication Date

May 2007

Volume

165

Issue

9

Start / End Page

1088 / 1095

Related Subject Headings

  • Time Factors
  • Sexual Behavior
  • Probability
  • Pregnancy
  • Pilot Projects
  • Ovulation
  • Models, Biological
  • Menstrual Cycle
  • Humans
  • Fertilization