Skip to main content
construction release_alert
Scholars@Duke will be undergoing maintenance April 11-15. Some features may be unavailable during this time.
cancel
Journal cover image

Spine microdomains for postsynaptic signaling and plasticity.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Newpher, TM; Ehlers, MD
Published in: Trends in cell biology
May 2009

Changes in the molecular composition and signaling properties of excitatory glutamatergic synapses onto dendritic spines mediate learning-related plasticity in the mammalian brain. This molecular adaptation serves as the most celebrated cell biological model for learning and memory. Within their micron-sized dimensions, dendritic spines restrict the diffusion of signaling molecules and spatially confine the activation of signal transduction pathways. Much of this local regulation occurs by spatial compartmentalization of glutamate receptors. Here, we review recently identified cell biological mechanisms regulating glutamate receptor mobility within individual dendritic spines. We discuss the emerging functions of glutamate receptors residing within sub-spine microdomains and propose a model for distinct signaling platforms with specialized functions in synaptic plasticity.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Trends in cell biology

DOI

EISSN

1879-3088

ISSN

0962-8924

Publication Date

May 2009

Volume

19

Issue

5

Start / End Page

218 / 227

Related Subject Headings

  • Synaptic Transmission
  • Synapses
  • Receptors, Glutamate
  • Neuronal Plasticity
  • Membrane Microdomains
  • Humans
  • Hippocampus
  • Developmental Biology
  • Dendritic Spines
  • Animals
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Newpher, T. M., & Ehlers, M. D. (2009). Spine microdomains for postsynaptic signaling and plasticity. Trends in Cell Biology, 19(5), 218–227. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tcb.2009.02.004
Newpher, Thomas M., and Michael D. Ehlers. “Spine microdomains for postsynaptic signaling and plasticity.Trends in Cell Biology 19, no. 5 (May 2009): 218–27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tcb.2009.02.004.
Newpher TM, Ehlers MD. Spine microdomains for postsynaptic signaling and plasticity. Trends in cell biology. 2009 May;19(5):218–27.
Newpher, Thomas M., and Michael D. Ehlers. “Spine microdomains for postsynaptic signaling and plasticity.Trends in Cell Biology, vol. 19, no. 5, May 2009, pp. 218–27. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.tcb.2009.02.004.
Newpher TM, Ehlers MD. Spine microdomains for postsynaptic signaling and plasticity. Trends in cell biology. 2009 May;19(5):218–227.
Journal cover image

Published In

Trends in cell biology

DOI

EISSN

1879-3088

ISSN

0962-8924

Publication Date

May 2009

Volume

19

Issue

5

Start / End Page

218 / 227

Related Subject Headings

  • Synaptic Transmission
  • Synapses
  • Receptors, Glutamate
  • Neuronal Plasticity
  • Membrane Microdomains
  • Humans
  • Hippocampus
  • Developmental Biology
  • Dendritic Spines
  • Animals