The role of angiotensin II in stress urinary incontinence: A rat model.

Published

Conference Paper

AIMS: Pharmacological treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is limited to the use of non-selective alpha-agonists, which are often ineffective. Non-adrenergic mechanisms have also been implicated in urethral closure, including angiotensin II (Ang-II), which has been demonstrated throughout the urinary tract. We investigate the role of Ang-II in urethral tone in a rat model of SUI. METHODS: Abdominal leak point pressure (ALPP) and retrograde urethral pressure profilometry (RLPP) were measured in 70 female virgin rats. Thirty rats underwent pudendal nerve injury (PNT), 30 had circumferential urethrolysis (U-Lys), and 10 had sham surgery. Rats received daily doses of Angiotensin Type 1 (AT-1) receptor inhibitor (20 mg/kg), Angiotensin Type 2 (AT-2) receptor antagonist (10 mg/kg), or Ang-II (2 mg/kg). RESULTS: Following U-Lys, RLPP and ALPP decreased from 21.4 +/- 2.0 and 39.2 +/- 3.3 mm Hg, to 13.1 +/- 1.5 and 21.6 +/- 1.9 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.01). After PNT, RLPP, and ALPP decreased from 21.0 +/- 1.6 and 41.9 +/- 3.0 mmHg to 13.1 +/- 1.5 and 24.7 +/- 3.3 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.01). AT-1 inhibitor caused significant decrease in RLPP and ALPP from 21.0 +/- 6.2 and 41.8 +/- 9.4 mmHg, to 12.0 +/- 3.8 and 25.6 +/- 6.6 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.01). Likewise, AT-2 treatment reduced RLPP and ALPP from 21.4 +/- 6.3 and 40.1 +/- 1.7 mmHg, to 13.5 +/- 5.7 and 31.0 +/- 7.2 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.01). Following surgery, Ang-II administration restored RLPP and ALPP to baseline presurgical values. CONCLUSIONS: AT-1 and AT-2 receptor inhibition significantly lowers urethral resistance, comparable to either neurogenic or urethrolytic injury. Ang-II treatment restored urethral tone in rats with intrinsic sphincter dysfunction. Ang II appears to serve a functional role in the maintenance of urethral tone and stress continence.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Phull, H; Salkini, M; Escobar, C; Purves, T; Comiter, CV

Published Date

  • January 1, 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 26 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 81 - 89

PubMed ID

  • 17029249

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17029249

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1520-6777

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0733-2467

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/nau.20339