Rationale and Design of the Aspirin Dosing-A Patient-Centric Trial Assessing Benefits and Long-term Effectiveness (ADAPTABLE) Trial.

Published online

Journal Article

Importance: Determining the right dosage of aspirin for the secondary prevention treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) remains an unanswered and critical question. Objective: To report the rationale and design for a randomized clinical trial to determine the optimal dosage of aspirin to be used for secondary prevention of ASCVD, using an innovative research method. Design, Setting, and Participants: This pragmatic, open-label, patient-centered, randomized clinical trial is being conducted in 15 000 patients within the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet), a distributed research network of partners including clinical research networks, health plan research networks, and patient-powered research networks across the United States. Patients with established ASCVD treated in routine clinical practice within the network are eligible. Patient recruitment began in April 2016. Enrollment was completed in June 2019. Final follow-up is expected to be completed by June 2020. Interventions: Participants are randomized on a web platform in a 1:1 fashion to either 81 mg or 325 mg of aspirin daily. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary efficacy end point is the composite of all-cause mortality, hospitalization for nonfatal myocardial infarction, or hospitalization for a nonfatal stroke. The primary safety end point is hospitalization for major bleeding associated with a blood-product transfusion. End points are captured through regular queries of the health systems' common data model within the structure of PCORnet's distributed data environment. Conclusions and Relevance: As a pragmatic study and the first interventional trial conducted within the PCORnet electronic data infrastructure, this trial is testing several unique and innovative operational approaches that have the potential to disrupt and transform the conduct of future patient-centered randomized clinical trials by evaluating treatments integrated in clinical practice while at the same time determining the optimal dosage of aspirin for secondary prevention of ASCVD. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02697916.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Marquis-Gravel, G; Roe, MT; Robertson, HR; Harrington, RA; Pencina, MJ; Berdan, LG; Hammill, BG; Faulkner, M; Muñoz, D; Fonarow, GC; Nallamothu, BK; Fintel, DJ; Ford, DE; Zhou, L; Daugherty, SE; Nauman, E; Kraschnewski, J; Ahmad, FS; Benziger, CP; Haynes, K; Merritt, JG; Metkus, T; Kripalani, S; Gupta, K; Shah, RC; McClay, JC; Re, RN; Geary, C; Lampert, BC; Bradley, SM; Jain, SK; Seifein, H; Whittle, J; Roger, VL; Effron, MB; Alvarado, G; Goldberg, YH; VanWormer, JL; Girotra, S; Farrehi, P; McTigue, KM; Rothman, R; Hernandez, AF; Jones, WS

Published Date

  • March 18, 2020

Published In

PubMed ID

  • 32186653

Pubmed Central ID

  • 32186653

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2380-6591

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/jamacardio.2020.0116

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States