Automatic registration between reference and on-board digital tomosynthesis images for positioning verification.

Published

Journal Article

The authors developed a hybrid multiresolution rigid-body registration technique to automatically register reference digital tomosynthesis (DTS) images with on-board DTS images to guide patient positioning in radiation therapy. This hybrid registration technique uses a faster but less accurate static method to achieve an initial registration, followed by a slower but more accurate adaptive method to fine tune the registration. A multiresolution scheme is employed in the registration to further improve the registration accuracy, robustness, and efficiency. Normalized mutual information is selected as the criterion for the similarity measure and the downhill simplex method is used as the search engine. This technique was tested using image data both from an anthropomorphic chest phantom and from eight head-and-neck cancer patients. The effects of the scan angle and the region-of-interest (ROI) size on the registration accuracy and robustness were investigated. The necessity of using the adaptive registration method in the hybrid technique was validated by comparing the results of the static method and the hybrid method. With a 44 degrees scan angle and a large ROI covering the entire DTS volume, the average of the registration capture ranges in single-axis simulations was between -31 and +34 deg for rotations and between -89 and +78 mm for translations in the phantom study, and between -38 and +38 deg for rotations and between -58 and +65 mm for translations in the patient study. Decreasing the DTS scan angle from 44 degrees to 22 degrees mainly degraded the registration accuracy and robustness for the out-of-plane rotations. Decreasing the ROI size from the entire DTS volume to the volume surrounding the spinal cord reduced the capture ranges to between -23 and +18 deg for rotations and between -33 and +43 mm for translations in the phantom study, and between -18 and +25 deg for rotations and between -35 and +39 mm for translations in the patient study. Results also showed that the hybrid registration technique had much larger capture ranges than the static method alone in registering the out-of-plane rotations.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Ren, L; Godfrey, DJ; Yan, H; Wu, QJ; Yin, F-F

Published Date

  • February 2008

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 35 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 664 - 672

PubMed ID

  • 18383688

Pubmed Central ID

  • 18383688

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2473-4209

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0094-2405

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1118/1.2831903

Language

  • eng