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Anne-Maria B. Makhulu CV

Associate Professor in the Department of Cultural Anthropology
Cultural Anthropology
Box 90091, Durham, NC 27708-0091
205 Friedl Building, Durham, NC 27708
CV

Selected Presentations & Appearances


'The Dialectics of Toil’: Reflections on the Politics of Space After Apartheid · April 24, 2018 Lecture Institute for African Studies, University of California, Berkeley
South Africa After the Rainbow · April 23, 2018 Invited Talk Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley
Black Capitalists and the Politics of South African State Capture - UNC African Studies Center Seminar Series · April 5, 2018 Invited Talk UNC,
Black Capitalists and the Politics of South African State Capture - African Studies Research Seminar · March 22, 2018 Invited Talk Emory University,
A Bid for Theory from the South: Experimental Thinking or Thinking with Uncertainty - American Anthropological Association Meetings · November 29, 2017 - December 3, 2017 National Scientific Meeting Washington, DC

“Zuma, Trump, Brexit,” panel organizer

'The Dialectics of Toil’: Reflections on the Politics of Space After Apartheid · April 24, 2018 Lecture Institute for African Studies, University of California, Berkeley
South Africa After the Rainbow · April 23, 2018 Invited Talk Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley
Black Capitalists and the Politics of South African State Capture - UNC African Studies Center Seminar Series · April 5, 2018 Invited Talk UNC,
Black Capitalists and the Politics of South African State Capture - African Studies Research Seminar · March 22, 2018 Invited Talk Emory University,
A Bid for Theory from the South: Experimental Thinking or Thinking with Uncertainty - American Anthropological Association Meetings · November 29, 2017 - December 3, 2017 National Scientific Meeting Washington, DC

“Zuma, Trump, Brexit,” panel organizer

Lessons from the Apartheid and Post-Apartheid City - Remapping the Urban Workshop · October 20, 2017 Invited Talk Global South and African Urbanisms Humanities Labs, University of Virginia
Lessons from the Apartheid and Post-Apartheid City - The Matter of Urban Citizenship Workshop · May 11, 2017 - May 12, 2017 Invited Talk Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
The Black Body in the Time-Space of the Negative - Global Blackness Conference · April 23, 2017 - April 25, 2017 Invited Talk African and African American Studies, Duke University
Provisional Notes on Black Affluence in South Africa - Department of Anthropology · March 16, 2017 Invited Talk Haverford College,
The Women’s March on Washington - Perspectives on States of Dis-Union Public Series · January 30, 2017 Invited Talk African and African American Studies, Duke University
The Ethnography of ‘Black Diamonds’: Provisional Notes on Black Affluence in South Africa - African Studies Workshop · November 7, 2016 Invited Talk Harvard University,
The Time-Space of the Negative - Anthropology Southern Africa Conference · October 2, 2016 Keynote/Named Lecture University of Venda,
The Politics of Black Resistance at Universities · April 29, 2016 Invited Talk Black Academic Caucus, University of Cape Town
Black Affluence: A Brief Outline for Future Work · April 28, 2016 Invited Talk New Social Forms Seminar, Stellenbosch University
Black Affluence: A Brief Outline for Future Work · April 26, 2016 Invited Talk Contemporary History and Humanities Seminar, University of the Western Cape
Black Affluence: A Brief Outline for Future Work · April 25, 2016 Invited Talk Sociology Seminar, University of Cape Town
Debt, Finance, and Securitization: The Economics, Politics, and Policing of #FeesMustFall,” “Race, Property, Debt - Race, Property, Debt Symposium · March 11, 2016 - March 12, 2016 Invited Talk Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Making Freedom: Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home · December 8, 2015 Broadcast Appearance Left of Black, Duke University
#FeesMustFall, #StudentBlackOut Day, and the New Student Movements · December 3, 2015 Other Concilium on Southern Africa, Duke University
The Postcolonial Contemporary · October 9, 2015 Other CUNY Graduate Center
The Fantastic and the Ordinary - Fantastic Contemporary Symposium · September 16, 2015 Lecture Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town

Paper delivered to the “Fantastic Contemporary Symposium,” organizers Nomusa Makhubu and Nkule Mabaso, Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town.

Urban Poverty Workshop · December 4, 2014 - December 5, 2014 Invited Talk Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University
Guest Lectures in International Comparative Studies on Johannesburg · November 17, 2014 - November 19, 2014 Lecture Duke University,
Screening and Discussion of film “The Battle for Johannesburg” - Global Cities · September 29, 2014 Lecture Duke University,
South African Cities - Global Cities Seminar · September 18, 2014 Lecture Duke University,
The Debt Economy: Credit and Capture in South Africa · September 9, 2014 - September 11, 2014 Invited Talk University of Sussex, Brighton, England

Paper delivered at African Studies Association UK in the "Labour, Insecurity and Violence in South Africa" Stream

Reckoning - Ends of Work Conference · May 9, 2014 Lecture Society of Cultural Anthropology,

“Reckoning,” paper delivered at the “Ends of Work” Conference

Reckoning - Diasporic Circuits Reconsidered conference · April 17, 2014 - April 18, 2014 Invited Talk University of Pennsylvania,

“Reckoning,” paper delivered at the “Diasporic Circuits Reconsidered” conference, University of Pennsylvania

City of Extremes: The Spatial Politics of Johannesburg - Shelter University Course · April 14, 2014 Lecture Duke University

Guest lecture in the “Shelter” University Course, Duke University

The New South African Debt Economy - “Beyond 'Marxism versus Postcolonialism' Symposium · April 4, 2014 Lecture Committee on Globalization and Social Change, CUNY Graduate Center

Paper delivered at the “Beyond 'Marxism versus Postcolonialism’"symposium, hosted by the Committee on Globalization and Social Change, CUNY Graduate Center

Prison, Lights, Action: Carceral Space on ‘The Wire’ · March 20, 2014 Invited Talk North Carolina Central University,

Public talk delivered at North Carolina Central University

The City in Theory · November 11, 2013 Lecture NYU, New York
After Work · March 7, 2013 Invited Talk Department of Anthropology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
After Work: South Africa’s Contingent Classes · November 17, 2012 Lecture American Anthropological Association Meetings, san Francisco
Marikana and “Violence at a Time of Liberation” · November 8, 2012 Lecture Duke University
Gaining Ground: Squatters and the Right to the City · October 10, 2012 Lecture AAAS, Duke University
The Right to the City Across the South African “Transition” · April 27, 2012 Lecture University of Wisconsin, Madison
Enchantings: Modernity, Culture, and the State in Postcolonial Africa conference · April 26, 2012 - April 28, 2012 Invited Talk Department of African Languages and Literatures, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Precarious Liberation: Workers, the State, and Contested Social Citizenship in Post-apartheid South Africa · March 13, 2012 Lecture Duke University
Politics of Prejudice: a conversation with Gyan Pandey - South Asia Center Workshop · February 17, 2012 Lecture Duke University,
Surface, Edge, Underneath: South Africa’s Cultural Contemporary · November 1, 2011 Lecture Duke University
Teaching "The Wire,” a conversation with Mark Anthony Neal · October 10, 2011 Lecture Duke University
Workshop on Area Studies in a Neoliberal Age · May 2, 2011 Lecture Duke University
The Consequences of Speculation: A View from South Africa · April 16, 2011 Lecture Johns Hopkins University
Pop Culture and Pedagogy: Teaching "The Wire" · February 17, 2011 Lecture African and African American Studies (AAAS) Graduate Working Group, Duke University
The Geography of Freedom · September 28, 2010 Lecture Johns Hopkins University
John Allen Life History · April 5, 2010 Lecture Duke University
Anthropology of Finance · March 31, 2010 Lecture Duke University
Performing Truth and Reconciliation: Aeschylus’s “Oresteia” in South Africa, · March 17, 2010 Lecture Duke University
The Geography of Freedom · March 9, 2010 Lecture Harvard University
The Geography of Freedom · March 4, 2010 Lecture New York University

Invited Lectures ; Anne-Maria Makhulu

The Genealogy of Freedom · February 26, 2010 Lecture Duke University

Invited Lectures ; The paper on which this talk was based derives from a much longer and more theoretical engagement with the concept of "freedom" both as a philosophical and historical category and its purchase in the contexts of colonialism and postcolonialism.

District 9: ‘Alien-Nation’, Sci-Fi and the Making of Ethno-Space · November 11, 2009 Lecture John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University
Unplanned Community: The Struggle for the South African City · October 23, 2009 Lecture SUNY Binghamton
Unplanned Community: The Struggle for the South African City · October 9, 2009 Lecture CUNY Graduate Center

Invited Lectures ; Anne-Maria Makhulu

African Ubuntu and South African Constitutionalism: Constructing a New Legal Culture · April 17, 2009 Lecture Franklin Center, Duke University
The Search for Economic Sovereignty · March 3, 2009 Lecture Institute for Public Knowledge, New York University
The Search for Economic Sovereignty · February 23, 2009 Lecture University of California Santa Cruz, Departments of Anthropology and Feminist Studies

Invited Lectures ; Anne-Maria Makhulu

The Search for Economic Sovereignty · February 4, 2009 Lecture Gender Justice and Body Politics Conference, University of Cape Town

Invited Lectures ; Anne-Maria Makhulu

Africa’s-Place-in-the-World: A Conversation with James Ferguson and Achille Mbembe · November 18, 2008 Lecture Franklin Center, Duke University
The Social Coordinates of Illness in Postcolonial Africa · October 3, 2008 Lecture Duke University
Africa and the African Diaspora: Traditions, Revolutions and Innovations · May 10, 2008 Lecture SUNY, Purchase, Symphony Space, New York
The Micro-Finance of Everyday Life: Family Economy in Neoliberal South Africa · April 14, 2008 Lecture Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania,

Invited Lectures ; Anne-Maria Makhulu ; “The Micro-Finance of Everyday Life: Family Economy in Neoliberal South Africa.” Paper presented to the Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania.

The Micro-Finance of Everyday Life: Family Economy in Neoliberal South Africa - Mellon-Sawyer Seminar Series, “Portents and Dilemmas: Environmental Politics and Public Health in India and China." · April 12, 2008 Lecture Duke University

Invited Lectures ; Anne-Maria Makhulu ; Paper presented at "Slums, Representation, and the Future: A Trans-Regional Conversation," organized by the 2007-2008 Mellon-Sawyer Seminar Series, “Portents and Dilemmas: Environmental Politics and Public Health in India and China."

Neoliberalism and Social Death in South Africa · February 4, 2008 Lecture SUNY, Purchase,

Invited Lectures ; Anne-Maria Makhulu ; An invited lecture, “Neoliberalism and Social Death in South Africa,” in the Africa and the African Diaspora yearlong series.

Outreach & Engaged Scholarship


Bass Connections Team Leader - Duke Design Health Fellows Program · 2019 - 2020 Projects & Field Work Bass Connections Open

Service to the Profession


Participant - Pathfinders Program · 2021 Professional Development National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD),
Editorial Board Member · 2018 Editorial Activities Cultural Anthropology (Journal),
Participant - Faculty Success Program · 2018 Professional Development National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD),
Co-organizer - “Race and Rurality” conference · March 26, 2015 - March 28, 2015 Event/Organization Administration Duke University,
Co-organizer - The Haunted Present: Reckoning After Apartheid conference · April 10, 2014 - April 11, 2014 Event/Organization Administration Concilium on Southern Africa, Duke University

Conferences Organized ; From April 26-29, 1994, South Africa held universal, democratic elections for the first time. Witnessed by the world, South Africans of all races waited patiently in lines to cast their ballots, signaling the official and symbolic birth of the “new South Africa.” The subsequent years, marked initially with euphoric hopes for racial healing enabled by institutional processes such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), have instead, most recently, inspired despair about epidemic levels of HIV/AIDS, violent crime, state corruption, and unbridled market reforms directed at everything from property to bodies to babies. At the same time, seemingly beleaguered state officials deploy the mantra “TINA” (There Is No Alternative [to neoliberal development]) to fend off critiques of growing income and wealth inequalities. To mark the anniversary, we propose a two-day interdisciplinary conference framed around the question of reckoning to reflect on twenty years of South African democracy in light of the contradictions and apparent failures that define the no-longer “new” South Africa. Against accounts depicting the liberation era as non-violent and peaceable, more nuanced analysis suggests not only that South Africa’s “revolution” was marked by both collective and individual violence—on the part of the state and the liberation movements—but in turn that reckoning with the present demands of scholars, the media, and cultural commentators that they begin to grapple more fully with the dimensions and different figurations of violence historically. Violence and reckoning appear as two central forces in contemporary South African political, economic and social life. Specifically, we pose the following questions: In the post-apartheid period, what forms of (individual, structural) violence have come to bear on South African life? How does this violence reckon with apartheid and its legacies? How can we or should we think about violence as a response to (failed?) reckoning of state initiatives like the TRC? In some measure the most intelligible forms of reckoning have emerged in the writing of history, ethnography, and through aesthetic forms, such as the novel, and plastic, and visual arts responding in varied fashion to the difficulties of South Africa’s ongoing transition in ways that other political, economic, historical, or social discourses have found remarkably challenging. And in consequence, “The Haunted Present” seeks to explore what a genuine accounting with South Africa’s past, present, and future might look like.

Participant - Pathfinders Program · 2021 Professional Development National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD),
Editorial Board Member · 2018 Editorial Activities Cultural Anthropology (Journal),
Participant - Faculty Success Program · 2018 Professional Development National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD),
Co-organizer - “Race and Rurality” conference · March 26, 2015 - March 28, 2015 Event/Organization Administration Duke University,
Co-organizer - The Haunted Present: Reckoning After Apartheid conference · April 10, 2014 - April 11, 2014 Event/Organization Administration Concilium on Southern Africa, Duke University

Conferences Organized ; From April 26-29, 1994, South Africa held universal, democratic elections for the first time. Witnessed by the world, South Africans of all races waited patiently in lines to cast their ballots, signaling the official and symbolic birth of the “new South Africa.” The subsequent years, marked initially with euphoric hopes for racial healing enabled by institutional processes such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), have instead, most recently, inspired despair about epidemic levels of HIV/AIDS, violent crime, state corruption, and unbridled market reforms directed at everything from property to bodies to babies. At the same time, seemingly beleaguered state officials deploy the mantra “TINA” (There Is No Alternative [to neoliberal development]) to fend off critiques of growing income and wealth inequalities. To mark the anniversary, we propose a two-day interdisciplinary conference framed around the question of reckoning to reflect on twenty years of South African democracy in light of the contradictions and apparent failures that define the no-longer “new” South Africa. Against accounts depicting the liberation era as non-violent and peaceable, more nuanced analysis suggests not only that South Africa’s “revolution” was marked by both collective and individual violence—on the part of the state and the liberation movements—but in turn that reckoning with the present demands of scholars, the media, and cultural commentators that they begin to grapple more fully with the dimensions and different figurations of violence historically. Violence and reckoning appear as two central forces in contemporary South African political, economic and social life. Specifically, we pose the following questions: In the post-apartheid period, what forms of (individual, structural) violence have come to bear on South African life? How does this violence reckon with apartheid and its legacies? How can we or should we think about violence as a response to (failed?) reckoning of state initiatives like the TRC? In some measure the most intelligible forms of reckoning have emerged in the writing of history, ethnography, and through aesthetic forms, such as the novel, and plastic, and visual arts responding in varied fashion to the difficulties of South Africa’s ongoing transition in ways that other political, economic, historical, or social discourses have found remarkably challenging. And in consequence, “The Haunted Present” seeks to explore what a genuine accounting with South Africa’s past, present, and future might look like.

Organizer - Meth Labs and the Ontologies of Making and Unmaking · February 19, 2014 Event/Organization Administration Duke University,

Organizer of “Meth Labs and the Ontologies of Making and Unmaking” seminar with Jason Pine (SUNY Purchase), Duke University

Organizer : Concilium on Southern Africa · July 2013 - April 2014 Event/Organization Administration Duke University
Conference Organizer : The Social Coordinates of Illness in Postcolonial Africa · October 3, 2008 - October 4, 2008 Event/Organization Administration Duke University

Service to Duke


Africa Initiative Steering Committee (Other) · 2019 Committee Service
Faculty Advisory Committee (Other) · 2018 Committee Service Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement,
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education Steering Committee (Other) · 2018 Committee Service
International Comparative Studies-Cultural Anthropology Joint Committee (Department) · 2017 Committee Service
Academic Council Faculty Scholars Committee Member (School) · 2017 - 2019 Committee Service Arts & Sciences,
Africa Initiative Steering Committee (Other) · 2019 Committee Service
Faculty Advisory Committee (Other) · 2018 Committee Service Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement,
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education Steering Committee (Other) · 2018 Committee Service
International Comparative Studies-Cultural Anthropology Joint Committee (Department) · 2017 Committee Service
Academic Council Faculty Scholars Committee Member (School) · 2017 - 2019 Committee Service Arts & Sciences,
Faculty Director · 2016 - 2022 Event/Organization Administration Mastercard Foundation Scholarship Program, Duke University
Reappointment Committee (Department) · 2016 - 2017 Committee Service
Social Sciences Research Institute Faculty Governing Board (University) · 2015 - 2016 Committee Service Duke University,
Provostial Masters Program Committee (University) · 2015 - 2016 Committee Service
Mellon-Mays Faculty Advisor · 2014 - 2015 Other
Graduate Admissions (Department) · December 10, 2013 - January 8, 2014 Committee Service Cultural Anthropology
Member . Concilium on Southern Africa · October 1, 2013 - October 1, 2013 Other Duke University

Other ; The Concilium on Southern Africa submitted a proposal to the Von der Heyden Committee in which we proposed to invite Archbishop Desmond Tutu to give the 2013-2014 Von de Heyden lecture. We continue to work on various aspects of this event.

International Comparative Studies Search (University) · January 1, 2013 - April 1, 2013 Committee Service ICS
Organizer . Curriculum Innovations · November 30, 2012 Curriculum Innovations

Curriculum Innovations ; I've developed two new courses in the last calendar year. The first inquires into the genealogy of financial crises and is inspired by the events of late 2008 as well as my own ongoing inquiry into market speculation in the global north and south. The first time the course was offered in Spring 2012 it drew a varied group--former business people, activist undergraduates involved in Occupy Durham and Duke, as well as committed graduate students in anthropology. The discussions were far-ranging and we learned a very great deal from one another. That the group was so distinct and its members so different from one another, in part, inspired a new way of thinking about the seminar room as a space in which everyone is an "expert" in something. I have gone on to think about the broader implications of gaining a proficiency in something such as the logic of the market, the search for profit and so on, and this has complemented my forays into formal economics in the Economics Department at Duke. My other newly developed course is entitled "Global Cities" and dovetails with the rubric of the Cultural Anthropology speaker series this year, which is largely concerned with the emergence of cities in the global south. "Global Cities" concludes this Monday and by and large I think it has been a tremendous success. We have covered great metropoli in the emerging markets countries or BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) and what has become quite apparent is the ways in which these are cities bound by greater similarities than differences--in built form, inequality, modes of precarious life and so on. It's been a pleasure to teach and at an institution striving to think about cities (I'm thinking here of the planned cities initiative) this seems to be a really useful way to proceed.

Departmental Representative (School) · November 30, 2012 - July 1, 2013 Committee Service Duke University
Co-Organizer . Speaker Series in Cultural Anthropology · November 30, 2012 - July 1, 2013 Other Cultural Anthropology Department

Other ; Rebel Cities is a year long speaker series focused on cities of the south, primarily in Africa and Asia. Following David Harvey’s recent book of the same title, the series is guided by the dual imperatives of understanding cities both as sites of surplus production and contestation over the redistribution and redeployment of surplus value. At the same time, the urban centers of the southern hemisphere suggest a whole array of alternative framings of the question of capital, its uneven and bumpy flows, and the protest politics that might arise from the rampant inequalities inherent to the creation of surplus. But beyond that, southern cities seem somehow “rebellious” not only for the reasons already suggested, but theoretically rebel as well. They are somehow uncategorizable within the taken-for-granted terms of Euro-American theories of the urban, urbane and metropolitan. What then would an urban theory from the south look like? What considerations of populations, practices of making-do, cultural production, negotiations of value, life and livelihood encompass the nature of cities as physical inscriptions of those very processes and practices? This is the matter at hand and hopefully the source of much productive discussion during the course of this academic year.

Organizer . Curriculum Innovations · December 15, 2011 - December 15, 2011 Curriculum Innovations

Curriculum Innovations ; This course introduces students to some of the debates relating to the current financial crisis—both within and beyond the field of finance itself. Combining media accounts (the NYTimes Deal Book and Wall Street Journal) with scholarly critiques of the current structures for money making—the resort to speculation, the dissolution of wage labor (what Denning calls “wageless life”), and the emergence of a world of radical inequality—this course is primarily committed to theorizing the culture of capitalism in the early 21st Century. Readings will cover a fairly significant historical period beginning with Braudel’s description of early Spanish mercantilism, Poovey’s history of the rise of accounting, the emergence of Atlantic capitalism more generally, and a significant and growing body of literature in the anthropology of finance whose focus ranges from addressing derivatives and the culture of circulation to the ethnography of Wall Street. The larger inter-disciplinary framework for the course encompasses inter-related fields of inquiry including anthropology, cultural geography, and political economy.

Organizer . Curriculum Innovations · November 30, 2010 - November 30, 2010 Curriculum Innovations Duke University

Curriculum Innovations ; Literacy in its broadest sense is a much debated term these days as teaching professionals, and literacy advocates, early childhood development specialists, cognitive scientists and the like, all debate the merits of old fashioned literacy (practices of reading and writing that assist in basic learning) over and above say the world of digital and other media, which lay at our finger tips. The last year or two I have necessarily made far greater use of audio and visual materials in the classroom, acknowledging their powers of representation, instruction, and imagination to communicate complex ideas by other means and media than simply the printed page. At the same time I continue to stress the importance of the craft of writing. Most of my courses are structured in such a way as to enable students to “write as they go.” By contrast, and in light of past experience, I tend to ask students to think about final projects by way of alternative media. They can work with a theme or “keyword” from the course interpreting that theme through pre-existing materials we have read, screened, or listened to and in recent semesters I have been delighted to see students respond by working on final projects that run the gamut: from scrapbooks and comic strips, to recipe books and collages, short films and soliloquies, to short video, and music performances. All these varied mediums in which students present work nevertheless draw on themes, concepts, and ideas from the course. Oddly enough, in these alternative forms students are most often eager to spend additional time preparing pieces of written work to accompany visual material. Somehow this marrying of image and word is more productive of good written work than were I simply to assign a final paper. In the spring of this past year I offered a new course based on the HBO TV series "The Wire," which served 50 undergraduate students. The course was much over-subscribed and in some ways would have benefited by being significantly smaller. I am offering this course again in Spring 2011, this time as a seminar to 15-20 students. I also plan to offer a new course in AY 2011-2012 addressing some of the current literature in Anthropology of Finance. Arguably, the current moment of ongoing fiscal crisis demands such a course and I'm hoping that preliminary research in South Africa will enable me to offer something as suited to students of Africa as anthropology.

Organizer . Curriculum Innovations · December 16, 2009 - December 16, 2009 Curriculum Innovations

Curriculum Innovations ; In the last year or so my ideas about undergraduate and graduate instruction have responded to Duke's interdisciplinary climate--on one hand I stress the productive aspects of interdisciplinarity while seeking to stress the virtues of the discipline in which I was instructed. When it comes to the teaching of core anthropological or social theoretical texts I try to read these not only critically, but immanently--to draw on the logics that construct them from within and thereby to suggest a virtue in them quite apart from say the postcolonial or poststructural critique available to all of us. I do this as willingly when teaching Adam Smith’s An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations as I do when referring Foucault’s Discipline and Punish. In other words I teach to the spirit of the ideas contained in varied works before mounting any counter reading. By the same measure, most of my syllabi are designed with a consistent argument or narrative arc in mind. Practically speaking this has led to some curricular and pedagogical innovations. The last year or so I have made far greater use of audio and visual materials in the classroom, acknowledging their powers of representation, instruction, and imagination to communicate complex ideas by other means and media than simply the printed page. Since adopting these new teaching tools, I have gone on to design a new course entitled "The Wire" offered for the first time in Spring 2010, which will marry some of the new instructional tools to my inter-disciplinary approach in the classroom. Modeled on the HBO series of the same title "The Wire" makes use of a classic literature in urban sociology/urban anthropology and political economy against the backdrop of 60 episode series.

Co-Organizer . AAAS Speaker Series · December 16, 2009 Other AAAS

Other ; Co-Organizer of the 2009-2010 Speaker Series in African and African American Studies, see www.aaas.duke.edu. Relatedly, I have also been placed in charge of the disbursing of co-sponsorship funds for AAAS.

Speaker Series in African and African American Studies (Department) · December 16, 2009 Committee Service AAAS
Graduate Committee (Department) · December 16, 2009 Committee Service Cultural Anthropology
Concilium on Southern Africa (University) · December 16, 2009 Committee Service Franklin Center
Global South Synergy Group (Department) · December 16, 2009 Committee Service AAAS
Concilium on Southern Africa (University) · December 16, 2009 Committee Service Franklin, Duke University
Global South Synergy Group (Department) · December 16, 2009 Committee Service
Graduate Committee - Cultural Anthropology (Department) · December 16, 2008 Committee Service Cultural Anthropology
Graduate Committee (Department) · August 1, 2008 Committee Service
Preliminary Search (Department) · August 1, 2008 Committee Service

Academic & Administrative Activities


Faculty Director, Mastercard Foundation Scholarship Program 2015-2022