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Charlotte S. Sussman

Professor of English
English
Box 90015, Durham, NC 27708-0015
302 Allen Building, Durham, NC 27708

Selected Publications


The masterless

Chapter · March 25, 2024 Full text Cite

On Walls, Bridges, and Temporal Folds: Epic, Empire, and Neoclassicism Revisited

Journal Article Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture · January 1, 2022 Full text Cite

Memorializing the Middle Passage on the Atlantic seabed in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction

Journal Article Marine Policy · December 1, 2020 More than 12.5 million Africans were held captive on 40,000+ voyages during the transatlantic slave trade. Many did not survive the voyage and the Atlantic seabed became their final resting place. Exploration for mineral resources on the international seab ... Full text Open Access Cite

Where will dido rest?

Journal Article Modern Philology · November 1, 2020 The name Dido means wanderer. Her story is one of wandering, and her story has itself wandered through the Western literary tradition, assuming a variety of forms. Those wanderings are the subject of this article, which considers them both as a lens throug ... Full text Cite

How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?

Journal Article English Language Notes · October 1, 2020 Full text Cite

Peopling the World Representing Human Mobility from Milton to Malthus

Book · April 24, 2020 By 1798, the idea that the world would one day be entirely filled by people had become, in Thomas Malthus's hands, a nightmarish vision. In Peopling the World, Charlotte Sussman asks how and why this shift took place. ... Cite

Historicizing freedom of movement: Memory and exile in political context

Chapter · January 1, 2018 This essay historicizes the concept of “freedom of movement” in the context of the late eighteenth-century desire to distinguish the free movement of emigrants from the coerced movement of slaves. It explores the distinction between free and unfree mobilit ... Full text Cite

Epic, exile, and the global: Felicia Hemans's The Forest Sanctuary

Journal Article Nineteenth-Century Literature · March 1, 2011 Why are there no children in the poems that Felicia Hemans wrote about the New World in the 1820s? Despite the longstanding representation of the Americas as a place where British culture might be renewed and reproduced, Hemans's poems depict it as a place ... Full text Cite

Time wandering: Problems of witnessing in the romantic-era novel

Journal Article Novel · March 1, 2010 This essay argues that the problem of witnessing in the Romantic-era novel is caught up with the problem of moral epistemology and that both are inflected by temporality. Focusing on Charles Maturin's 1820 gothic Melmoth the Wanderer, this essay argues tha ... Full text Cite

‘Launched upon the sea of moral and political inquiry’: The ethical experiments of the romantic novel

Chapter · January 1, 2010 Although it is less often remarked upon than the other revolutions of the Romantic era, an epoch-making event occurred in the British literary field at the end of the eighteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth: the novel quantifiably became the ... Full text Cite

Preface

Book · January 1, 2010 Despite their diversity of approaches, the essays in this volume challenge us to rethink our ideas of the novel as a genre, and of the literary movement known as Romanticism. They propose that the Romantic-era novel was characterized by a fierce concern wi ... Full text Cite

Recognizing the romantic novel: New histories of British fiction, 1780–1830

Book · January 1, 2010 The British Romantic era was a vibrant and exciting time in the history of the novel. Yet, aside from a few iconic books —Pride and Prejudice, Frankenstein—it has been ignored or dismissed by later readers and critics. Bringing this rich but neglected body ... Full text Cite

Review of Christopher Leslie Brown, Moral Capital

Journal Article Social History · February 2008 Featured Publication Cite

Life and Letters in the City

Journal Article The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation · June 2007 Featured Publication Cite

The masterless

Chapter · March 25, 2024 Full text Cite

On Walls, Bridges, and Temporal Folds: Epic, Empire, and Neoclassicism Revisited

Journal Article Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture · January 1, 2022 Full text Cite

Memorializing the Middle Passage on the Atlantic seabed in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction

Journal Article Marine Policy · December 1, 2020 More than 12.5 million Africans were held captive on 40,000+ voyages during the transatlantic slave trade. Many did not survive the voyage and the Atlantic seabed became their final resting place. Exploration for mineral resources on the international seab ... Full text Open Access Cite

Where will dido rest?

Journal Article Modern Philology · November 1, 2020 The name Dido means wanderer. Her story is one of wandering, and her story has itself wandered through the Western literary tradition, assuming a variety of forms. Those wanderings are the subject of this article, which considers them both as a lens throug ... Full text Cite

How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?

Journal Article English Language Notes · October 1, 2020 Full text Cite

Peopling the World Representing Human Mobility from Milton to Malthus

Book · April 24, 2020 By 1798, the idea that the world would one day be entirely filled by people had become, in Thomas Malthus's hands, a nightmarish vision. In Peopling the World, Charlotte Sussman asks how and why this shift took place. ... Cite

Historicizing freedom of movement: Memory and exile in political context

Chapter · January 1, 2018 This essay historicizes the concept of “freedom of movement” in the context of the late eighteenth-century desire to distinguish the free movement of emigrants from the coerced movement of slaves. It explores the distinction between free and unfree mobilit ... Full text Cite

Epic, exile, and the global: Felicia Hemans's The Forest Sanctuary

Journal Article Nineteenth-Century Literature · March 1, 2011 Why are there no children in the poems that Felicia Hemans wrote about the New World in the 1820s? Despite the longstanding representation of the Americas as a place where British culture might be renewed and reproduced, Hemans's poems depict it as a place ... Full text Cite

Time wandering: Problems of witnessing in the romantic-era novel

Journal Article Novel · March 1, 2010 This essay argues that the problem of witnessing in the Romantic-era novel is caught up with the problem of moral epistemology and that both are inflected by temporality. Focusing on Charles Maturin's 1820 gothic Melmoth the Wanderer, this essay argues tha ... Full text Cite

‘Launched upon the sea of moral and political inquiry’: The ethical experiments of the romantic novel

Chapter · January 1, 2010 Although it is less often remarked upon than the other revolutions of the Romantic era, an epoch-making event occurred in the British literary field at the end of the eighteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth: the novel quantifiably became the ... Full text Cite

Preface

Book · January 1, 2010 Despite their diversity of approaches, the essays in this volume challenge us to rethink our ideas of the novel as a genre, and of the literary movement known as Romanticism. They propose that the Romantic-era novel was characterized by a fierce concern wi ... Full text Cite

Recognizing the romantic novel: New histories of British fiction, 1780–1830

Book · January 1, 2010 The British Romantic era was a vibrant and exciting time in the history of the novel. Yet, aside from a few iconic books —Pride and Prejudice, Frankenstein—it has been ignored or dismissed by later readers and critics. Bringing this rich but neglected body ... Full text Cite

Review of Christopher Leslie Brown, Moral Capital

Journal Article Social History · February 2008 Featured Publication Cite

Life and Letters in the City

Journal Article The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation · June 2007 Featured Publication Cite

"Islanded in the world": Cultural memory and human mobility in The Last Man

Journal Article PMLA · January 1, 2003 The Last Man, Mary Shelley's novel of 1826, describes the extinction of humanity by a plague that leaves only one man alive. The plague exerts pressure on the idea of national community by forcing a reevaluation of the number of people needed to continue a ... Full text Cite

The Empty Spaces of The Heart of Midlothian: Nation, Narration and Depopulation

Journal Article Eighteenth-Century Fiction · October 2002 Cite

The Art of Oblivion: Charlotte Smith and Helen of Troy

Journal Article Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture · 1998 Cite

Women and the Politics of Sugar, 1792

Journal Article Representations · January 1, 1994 Full text Cite