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Doppler-detected valve movement in aortic stenosis: a predictor of adverse outcome.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Ren, X; Banki, NM; Shaw, RE; McNulty, EJ; Williams, SC; Pencina, M; Schiller, NB
Published in: Clin Cardiol
March 2014

BACKGROUND: The absence of auscultatory aortic valve closure sound is associated with severe aortic stenosis. The absence of Doppler-derived aortic opening (Aop ) or closing (Acl ) may be a sign of advanced severe aortic stenosis. HYPOTHESIS: Absent Doppler-detected Aop or Acl transient is indicative of very severe aortic stenosis and is associated with adverse outcome. METHODS: A total of 118 consecutive patients with moderate (n = 63) or severe aortic stenosis (n = 55) were included. Aop and Acl signals were identified in a blinded fashion by continuous-wave Doppler. Patients with and without Aop and Acl were compared using χ(2) test for dichotomous variables and analysis of variance for continuous variables. The associations of Aop and Acl with aortic valve replacement were determined. RESULTS: Aop or Acl were absent in 22 of 118 patients. The absence of Aop or Acl was associated with echocardiographic parameters of severe aortic stenosis. The absence of Aop or Acl was associated with incident aortic valve replacement (36.4% vs 7.3%, respectively, P < 0.001). Even in patients with aortic valve area <1 cm(2) , the absence of Aop or Acl was still associated with increased rate of aortic valve replacement (42.1% vs 13.9%, respectively, P = 0.019) and provided incremental predictive value over peak velocity. CONCLUSIONS: In a typical population of patients with aortic stenosis, approximately 1 in 6 has no detectible aortic valve opening or closing Doppler signal. The absence of an Aop or Acl signal is a highly specific sign of severe aortic stenosis and is associated with incident aortic valve replacement.

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Published In

Clin Cardiol

DOI

EISSN

1932-8737

Publication Date

March 2014

Volume

37

Issue

3

Start / End Page

167 / 171

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Heart Valve Prosthesis
  • Heart Failure
  • Heart Auscultation
  • Female
  • Echocardiography, Doppler
  • Cardiovascular System & Hematology
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
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Ren, X., Banki, N. M., Shaw, R. E., McNulty, E. J., Williams, S. C., Pencina, M., & Schiller, N. B. (2014). Doppler-detected valve movement in aortic stenosis: a predictor of adverse outcome. Clin Cardiol, 37(3), 167–171. https://doi.org/10.1002/clc.22236
Ren, Xiushui, Nader M. Banki, Richard E. Shaw, Edward J. McNulty, Sherry C. Williams, Michael Pencina, and Nelson B. Schiller. “Doppler-detected valve movement in aortic stenosis: a predictor of adverse outcome.Clin Cardiol 37, no. 3 (March 2014): 167–71. https://doi.org/10.1002/clc.22236.
Ren X, Banki NM, Shaw RE, McNulty EJ, Williams SC, Pencina M, et al. Doppler-detected valve movement in aortic stenosis: a predictor of adverse outcome. Clin Cardiol. 2014 Mar;37(3):167–71.
Ren, Xiushui, et al. “Doppler-detected valve movement in aortic stenosis: a predictor of adverse outcome.Clin Cardiol, vol. 37, no. 3, Mar. 2014, pp. 167–71. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/clc.22236.
Ren X, Banki NM, Shaw RE, McNulty EJ, Williams SC, Pencina M, Schiller NB. Doppler-detected valve movement in aortic stenosis: a predictor of adverse outcome. Clin Cardiol. 2014 Mar;37(3):167–171.
Journal cover image

Published In

Clin Cardiol

DOI

EISSN

1932-8737

Publication Date

March 2014

Volume

37

Issue

3

Start / End Page

167 / 171

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Male
  • Humans
  • Heart Valve Prosthesis
  • Heart Failure
  • Heart Auscultation
  • Female
  • Echocardiography, Doppler
  • Cardiovascular System & Hematology