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Mental health antecedents of early midlife insomnia: evidence from a four-decade longitudinal study.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Goldman-Mellor, S; Gregory, AM; Caspi, A; Harrington, H; Parsons, M; Poulton, R; Moffitt, TE
Published in: Sleep
November 2014

Insomnia is a highly prevalent condition that constitutes a major public health and economic burden. However, little is known about the developmental etiology of adulthood insomnia.We examined whether indicators of psychological vulnerability across multiple developmental periods (psychiatric diagnoses in young adulthood and adolescence, childhood behavioral problems, and familial psychiatric history) predicted subsequent insomnia in adulthood.We used data from the ongoing Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a population-representative birth cohort study of 1,037 children in New Zealand who were followed prospectively from birth (1972-1973) through their fourth decade of life with a 95% retention rate.Insomnia was diagnosed at age 38 according to DSM-IV criteria. Psychiatric diagnoses, behavioral problems, and family psychiatric histories were assessed between ages 5 and 38.In cross-sectional analyses, insomnia was highly comorbid with multiple psychiatric disorders. After controlling for this concurrent comorbidity, our results showed that individuals who have family histories of depression or anxiety, and who manifest lifelong depression and anxiety beginning in childhood, are at uniquely high risk for age-38 insomnia. Other disorders did not predict adulthood insomnia.The link between lifelong depression and anxiety symptoms and adulthood insomnia calls for further studies to clarify the neurophysiological systems or behavioral conditioning processes that may underlie this association.

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Published In

Sleep

DOI

EISSN

1550-9109

ISSN

0161-8105

Publication Date

November 2014

Volume

37

Issue

11

Start / End Page

1767 / 1775

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Social Class
  • Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
  • Sex Characteristics
  • Prospective Studies
  • Prevalence
  • New Zealand
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Mental Health
  • Mental Disorders
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Goldman-Mellor, S., Gregory, A. M., Caspi, A., Harrington, H., Parsons, M., Poulton, R., & Moffitt, T. E. (2014). Mental health antecedents of early midlife insomnia: evidence from a four-decade longitudinal study. Sleep, 37(11), 1767–1775. https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.4168
Goldman-Mellor, Sidra, Alice M. Gregory, Avshalom Caspi, HonaLee Harrington, Michael Parsons, Richie Poulton, and Terrie E. Moffitt. “Mental health antecedents of early midlife insomnia: evidence from a four-decade longitudinal study.Sleep 37, no. 11 (November 2014): 1767–75. https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.4168.
Goldman-Mellor S, Gregory AM, Caspi A, Harrington H, Parsons M, Poulton R, et al. Mental health antecedents of early midlife insomnia: evidence from a four-decade longitudinal study. Sleep. 2014 Nov;37(11):1767–75.
Goldman-Mellor, Sidra, et al. “Mental health antecedents of early midlife insomnia: evidence from a four-decade longitudinal study.Sleep, vol. 37, no. 11, Nov. 2014, pp. 1767–75. Epmc, doi:10.5665/sleep.4168.
Goldman-Mellor S, Gregory AM, Caspi A, Harrington H, Parsons M, Poulton R, Moffitt TE. Mental health antecedents of early midlife insomnia: evidence from a four-decade longitudinal study. Sleep. 2014 Nov;37(11):1767–1775.
Journal cover image

Published In

Sleep

DOI

EISSN

1550-9109

ISSN

0161-8105

Publication Date

November 2014

Volume

37

Issue

11

Start / End Page

1767 / 1775

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Social Class
  • Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
  • Sex Characteristics
  • Prospective Studies
  • Prevalence
  • New Zealand
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Mental Health
  • Mental Disorders