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Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Freedman, BI; Julian, BA; Pastan, SO; Israni, AK; Schladt, D; Gautreaux, MD; Hauptfeld, V; Bray, RA; Gebel, HM; Kirk, AD; Gaston, RS; Mohan, S ...
Published in: Am J Transplant
June 2015

Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p = 0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p = 0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p = 0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes.

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Published In

Am J Transplant

DOI

EISSN

1600-6143

Publication Date

June 2015

Volume

15

Issue

6

Start / End Page

1615 / 1622

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Tissue Donors
  • Survival Rate
  • Surgery
  • Risk Factors
  • North Carolina
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Lipoproteins, HDL
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Freedman, B. I., Julian, B. A., Pastan, S. O., Israni, A. K., Schladt, D., Gautreaux, M. D., … Divers, J. (2015). Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure. Am J Transplant, 15(6), 1615–1622. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.13223
Freedman, B. I., B. A. Julian, S. O. Pastan, A. K. Israni, D. Schladt, M. D. Gautreaux, V. Hauptfeld, et al. “Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure.Am J Transplant 15, no. 6 (June 2015): 1615–22. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.13223.
Freedman BI, Julian BA, Pastan SO, Israni AK, Schladt D, Gautreaux MD, et al. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure. Am J Transplant. 2015 Jun;15(6):1615–22.
Freedman, B. I., et al. “Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure.Am J Transplant, vol. 15, no. 6, June 2015, pp. 1615–22. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/ajt.13223.
Freedman BI, Julian BA, Pastan SO, Israni AK, Schladt D, Gautreaux MD, Hauptfeld V, Bray RA, Gebel HM, Kirk AD, Gaston RS, Rogers J, Farney AC, Orlando G, Stratta RJ, Mohan S, Ma L, Langefeld CD, Hicks PJ, Palmer ND, Adams PL, Palanisamy A, Reeves-Daniel AM, Divers J. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure. Am J Transplant. 2015 Jun;15(6):1615–1622.
Journal cover image

Published In

Am J Transplant

DOI

EISSN

1600-6143

Publication Date

June 2015

Volume

15

Issue

6

Start / End Page

1615 / 1622

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Tissue Donors
  • Survival Rate
  • Surgery
  • Risk Factors
  • North Carolina
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Lipoproteins, HDL