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Chapter two: methodologies for characterisation of combustion sources and for quantification of their emissions.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Mitra, AP; Morawska, L; Sharma, C; Zhang, J
Published in: Chemosphere
December 2002

Emissions from the combustion of biomass and fossil fuels result in generation of a large number of particle and gaseous products in outdoor and/or indoor air, which create health and environmental risks. Of particular importance are the very small particles that are emitted in large quantities from all the combustion sources, and that could be potentially more significant in terms of their impact on health and the environment than larger particles. It is important to quantify particle emissions from combustion sources for regulatory and control purposes in relation to air quality. This paper is a review of particle characteristics that are used as source signatures, their general advantages and limitations, as well as a review of source signatures of the most common combustion pollution sources including road transport, industrial facilities, small household combustion devices, environmental tobacco smoke, and vegetation burning. The current methods for measuring particle physical characteristics (mass and number concentrations) and principles of methodologies for measuring emission factors are discussed in the paper as well. Finally, the paper presents the recommendations for the future techniques for measurements of combustion products.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Chemosphere

DOI

EISSN

1879-1298

ISSN

0045-6535

Publication Date

December 2002

Volume

49

Issue

9

Start / End Page

903 / 922

Related Subject Headings

  • Tobacco Smoke Pollution
  • Risk Assessment
  • Reference Values
  • Public Health
  • Particle Size
  • Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
  • Industry
  • Incineration
  • Humans
  • Fossil Fuels
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Mitra, A. P., Morawska, L., Sharma, C., & Zhang, J. (2002). Chapter two: methodologies for characterisation of combustion sources and for quantification of their emissions. Chemosphere, 49(9), 903–922. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0045-6535(02)00236-9
Mitra, A. P., Lidia Morawska, Chhemendra Sharma, and Jim Zhang. “Chapter two: methodologies for characterisation of combustion sources and for quantification of their emissions.Chemosphere 49, no. 9 (December 2002): 903–22. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0045-6535(02)00236-9.
Mitra AP, Morawska L, Sharma C, Zhang J. Chapter two: methodologies for characterisation of combustion sources and for quantification of their emissions. Chemosphere. 2002 Dec;49(9):903–22.
Mitra, A. P., et al. “Chapter two: methodologies for characterisation of combustion sources and for quantification of their emissions.Chemosphere, vol. 49, no. 9, Dec. 2002, pp. 903–22. Epmc, doi:10.1016/s0045-6535(02)00236-9.
Mitra AP, Morawska L, Sharma C, Zhang J. Chapter two: methodologies for characterisation of combustion sources and for quantification of their emissions. Chemosphere. 2002 Dec;49(9):903–922.
Journal cover image

Published In

Chemosphere

DOI

EISSN

1879-1298

ISSN

0045-6535

Publication Date

December 2002

Volume

49

Issue

9

Start / End Page

903 / 922

Related Subject Headings

  • Tobacco Smoke Pollution
  • Risk Assessment
  • Reference Values
  • Public Health
  • Particle Size
  • Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
  • Industry
  • Incineration
  • Humans
  • Fossil Fuels