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Effect of exercise and menstrual cycle status on plasma lipids, low density lipoprotein particle size, and apolipoproteins.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Lamon-Fava, S; Fisher, EC; Nelson, ME; Evans, WJ; Millar, JS; Ordovas, JM; Schaefer, EJ
Published in: J Clin Endocrinol Metab
January 1989

Habitual physical exercise has been reported to have beneficial effects on plasma lipoproteins. To examine this question in women, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and B levels, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size were determined in 25 women runners (9 of whom had exercise-related secondary amenorrhea) and 36 age-matched nonexercising women (controls). The eumenorrheic runners had significantly lower apo B levels and significantly greater mean apo A-I/apo B ratios and LDL particle sizes than did the control women (P less than 0.05). Lower apo B levels were correlated with decreased body mass index, a known exercise effect (P less than 0.0001). In addition, normally menstruating runners had cholesterol and triglyceride levels that were 7.6% and 25.4% lower, respectively, and apo A-I levels that were 6.4% higher than control women (P = NS). In amenorrheic runners all parameters were similar to values in control women, except that apo B levels were 20% lower (P less than 0.05). Amenorrheic runners had lower plasma apo A-I levels (13%) and significantly lower apo A-I/apo B ratios and estradiol levels than eumenorrheic runners, and serum estradiol values in the runners were correlated with apo A-I levels (P less than 0.01). These data indicate that the beneficial effects of strenuous exercise on plasma apo A-I levels and apo A-I/apo B ratios in women runners can be reversed by exercise-induced amenorrhea and decreased serum estradiol levels, and that women runners have lower apo B levels than nonexercising women, regardless of menstrual status.

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Published In

J Clin Endocrinol Metab

DOI

ISSN

0021-972X

Publication Date

January 1989

Volume

68

Issue

1

Start / End Page

17 / 21

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Thyroid Hormones
  • Particle Size
  • Menstrual Cycle
  • Lipoproteins, LDL
  • Lipids
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Exercise
  • Estradiol
  • Energy Intake
 

Citation

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ICMJE
MLA
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Lamon-Fava, S., Fisher, E. C., Nelson, M. E., Evans, W. J., Millar, J. S., Ordovas, J. M., & Schaefer, E. J. (1989). Effect of exercise and menstrual cycle status on plasma lipids, low density lipoprotein particle size, and apolipoproteins. J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 68(1), 17–21. https://doi.org/10.1210/jcem-68-1-17
Lamon-Fava, S., E. C. Fisher, M. E. Nelson, W. J. Evans, J. S. Millar, J. M. Ordovas, and E. J. Schaefer. “Effect of exercise and menstrual cycle status on plasma lipids, low density lipoprotein particle size, and apolipoproteins.J Clin Endocrinol Metab 68, no. 1 (January 1989): 17–21. https://doi.org/10.1210/jcem-68-1-17.
Lamon-Fava S, Fisher EC, Nelson ME, Evans WJ, Millar JS, Ordovas JM, et al. Effect of exercise and menstrual cycle status on plasma lipids, low density lipoprotein particle size, and apolipoproteins. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989 Jan;68(1):17–21.
Lamon-Fava, S., et al. “Effect of exercise and menstrual cycle status on plasma lipids, low density lipoprotein particle size, and apolipoproteins.J Clin Endocrinol Metab, vol. 68, no. 1, Jan. 1989, pp. 17–21. Pubmed, doi:10.1210/jcem-68-1-17.
Lamon-Fava S, Fisher EC, Nelson ME, Evans WJ, Millar JS, Ordovas JM, Schaefer EJ. Effect of exercise and menstrual cycle status on plasma lipids, low density lipoprotein particle size, and apolipoproteins. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989 Jan;68(1):17–21.
Journal cover image

Published In

J Clin Endocrinol Metab

DOI

ISSN

0021-972X

Publication Date

January 1989

Volume

68

Issue

1

Start / End Page

17 / 21

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Thyroid Hormones
  • Particle Size
  • Menstrual Cycle
  • Lipoproteins, LDL
  • Lipids
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Exercise
  • Estradiol
  • Energy Intake