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The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems: evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a longitudinal birth cohort.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Rivenbark, JG; Odgers, CL; Caspi, A; Harrington, H; Hogan, S; Houts, RM; Poulton, R; Moffitt, TE
Published in: Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines
June 2018

Children with conduct problems that persist into adulthood are at increased risk for future behavioral, health, and social problems. However, the longer term public service usage among these children has not been fully documented. To aid public health and intervention planning, adult service usage across criminal justice, health care, and social welfare domains is compared among all individuals from a representative cohort who followed different conduct problem trajectories from childhood into adulthood.Participants are from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a prospective, representative cohort of consecutive births (N = 1,037) from April 1972 to March 1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand. Regression analyses were used to compare levels of public service usage up to age 38, gathered via administrative and electronic medical records, between participants who displayed distinct subtypes of childhood conduct problems (low, childhood-limited, adolescent-onset, and life-course persistent).Children exhibiting life-course persistent conduct problems used significantly more services as adults than those with low levels of childhood conduct problems. Although this group comprised only 9.0% of the population, they accounted for 53.3% of all convictions, 15.7% of emergency department visits, 20.5% of prescription fills, 13.1% of injury claims, and 24.7% of welfare benefit months. Half of this group (50.0%) also accrued high service use across all three domains of criminal justice, health, and social welfare services, as compared to only 11.3% of those with low conduct problems (OR = 7.27, 95% CI = 4.42-12.0).Conduct problems in childhood signal high future costs in terms of service utilization across multiple sectors. Future evaluations of interventions aimed at conduct problems should also track potential reductions in health burden and service usage that stretch into midlife.

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Published In

Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines

DOI

EISSN

1469-7610

ISSN

0021-9630

Publication Date

June 2018

Volume

59

Issue

6

Start / End Page

703 / 710

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • New Zealand
  • Male
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Facilities and Services Utilization
  • Emergency Service, Hospital
  • Electronic Health Records
  • Drug Prescriptions
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Rivenbark, J. G., Odgers, C. L., Caspi, A., Harrington, H., Hogan, S., Houts, R. M., … Moffitt, T. E. (2018). The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems: evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a longitudinal birth cohort. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 59(6), 703–710. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12850
Rivenbark, Joshua G., Candice L. Odgers, Avshalom Caspi, HonaLee Harrington, Sean Hogan, Renate M. Houts, Richie Poulton, and Terrie E. Moffitt. “The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems: evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a longitudinal birth cohort.Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines 59, no. 6 (June 2018): 703–10. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12850.
Rivenbark JG, Odgers CL, Caspi A, Harrington H, Hogan S, Houts RM, et al. The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems: evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a longitudinal birth cohort. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines. 2018 Jun;59(6):703–10.
Rivenbark, Joshua G., et al. “The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems: evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a longitudinal birth cohort.Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 59, no. 6, June 2018, pp. 703–10. Epmc, doi:10.1111/jcpp.12850.
Rivenbark JG, Odgers CL, Caspi A, Harrington H, Hogan S, Houts RM, Poulton R, Moffitt TE. The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems: evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a longitudinal birth cohort. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines. 2018 Jun;59(6):703–710.
Journal cover image

Published In

Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines

DOI

EISSN

1469-7610

ISSN

0021-9630

Publication Date

June 2018

Volume

59

Issue

6

Start / End Page

703 / 710

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • New Zealand
  • Male
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Facilities and Services Utilization
  • Emergency Service, Hospital
  • Electronic Health Records
  • Drug Prescriptions