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Aerosol jet printing of biological inks by ultrasonic delivery.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Williams, NX; Watson, N; Joh, DY; Chilkoti, A; Franklin, AD
Published in: Biofabrication
February 2020

Printing is a promising method to reduce the cost of fabricating biomedical devices. While there have been significant advancements in direct-write printing techniques, non-contact printing of biological reagents has been almost exclusively limited to inkjet printing. Motivated by this lacuna, this work investigated aerosol jet printing (AJP) of biological reagents onto a nonfouling polymer brush to fabricate in vitro diagnostic (IVD) assays. The ultrasonication ink delivery process, which had previously been reported to damage DNA molecules, caused no degradation of printed proteins, allowing printing of a streptavidin-biotin binding assay with sub-nanogram ml-1 analytical sensitivity. Furthermore, a carcinoembryogenic antigen IVD was printed and found to have sensitivities in the clinically relevant range (limit of detection of approximately 0.5 ng ml-1 and a dynamic range of approximately three orders of magnitude). Finally, the multi-material printing capabilities of the aerosol jet printer were demonstrated by printing silver nanowires and streptavidin as interconnected patterns in the same print job without removal of the substrate from the printer, which will facilitate the fabrication of mixed-material devices. As cost, versatility, and ink usage become more prominent factors in the development of IVDs, this work has shown that AJP should become a more widely considered technique for fabrication.

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Published In

Biofabrication

DOI

EISSN

1758-5090

ISSN

1758-5082

Publication Date

February 2020

Volume

12

Issue

2

Start / End Page

025004

Related Subject Headings

  • Ultrasonics
  • Silver
  • Printing, Three-Dimensional
  • Printing
  • Polymers
  • Ink
  • Bioprinting
  • 4003 Biomedical engineering
  • 3206 Medical biotechnology
  • 1099 Other Technology
 

Citation

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Williams, N. X., Watson, N., Joh, D. Y., Chilkoti, A., & Franklin, A. D. (2020). Aerosol jet printing of biological inks by ultrasonic delivery. Biofabrication, 12(2), 025004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1758-5090/ab5cf5
Williams, Nicholas X., Nathan Watson, Daniel Y. Joh, Ashutosh Chilkoti, and Aaron D. Franklin. “Aerosol jet printing of biological inks by ultrasonic delivery.Biofabrication 12, no. 2 (February 2020): 025004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1758-5090/ab5cf5.
Williams NX, Watson N, Joh DY, Chilkoti A, Franklin AD. Aerosol jet printing of biological inks by ultrasonic delivery. Biofabrication. 2020 Feb;12(2):025004.
Williams, Nicholas X., et al. “Aerosol jet printing of biological inks by ultrasonic delivery.Biofabrication, vol. 12, no. 2, Feb. 2020, p. 025004. Epmc, doi:10.1088/1758-5090/ab5cf5.
Williams NX, Watson N, Joh DY, Chilkoti A, Franklin AD. Aerosol jet printing of biological inks by ultrasonic delivery. Biofabrication. 2020 Feb;12(2):025004.
Journal cover image

Published In

Biofabrication

DOI

EISSN

1758-5090

ISSN

1758-5082

Publication Date

February 2020

Volume

12

Issue

2

Start / End Page

025004

Related Subject Headings

  • Ultrasonics
  • Silver
  • Printing, Three-Dimensional
  • Printing
  • Polymers
  • Ink
  • Bioprinting
  • 4003 Biomedical engineering
  • 3206 Medical biotechnology
  • 1099 Other Technology