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LPS-binding IgG arrests actively motile Salmonella Typhimurium in gastrointestinal mucus.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Schroeder, HA; Newby, J; Schaefer, A; Subramani, B; Tubbs, A; Gregory Forest, M; Miao, E; Lai, SK
Published in: Mucosal Immunol
September 2020

The gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa is coated with a continuously secreted mucus layer that serves as the first line of defense against invading enteric bacteria. We have previously shown that antigen-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) can immobilize viruses in both human airway and genital mucus secretions through multiple low-affinity bonds between the array of virion-bound IgG and mucins, thereby facilitating their rapid elimination from mucosal surfaces and preventing mucosal transmission. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether weak IgG-mucin crosslinks could reinforce the mucus barrier against the permeation of bacteria driven by active flagella beating, or in predominantly MUC2 mucus gel. Here, we performed high-resolution multiple particle tracking to capture the real-time motion of hundreds of individual fluorescent Salmonella Typhimurium in fresh, undiluted GI mucus from Rag1-/- mice, and analyzed the motion using a hidden Markov model framework. In contrast to control IgG, the addition of anti-lipopolysaccharide IgG to GI mucus markedly reduced the progressive motility of Salmonella by lowering the swim speed and retaining individual bacteria in an undirected motion state. Effective crosslinking of Salmonella to mucins was dependent on Fc N-glycans. Our findings implicate IgG-mucin crosslinking as a broadly conserved function that reduces mucous penetration of both bacterial and viral pathogens.

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Published In

Mucosal Immunol

DOI

EISSN

1935-3456

Publication Date

September 2020

Volume

13

Issue

5

Start / End Page

814 / 823

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Salmonella typhimurium
  • Salmonella Infections
  • Protein Binding
  • Polysaccharides
  • Mucus
  • Mice
  • Lipopolysaccharides
  • Intestinal Mucosa
  • Immunology
  • Immunoglobulin G
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Schroeder, H. A., Newby, J., Schaefer, A., Subramani, B., Tubbs, A., Gregory Forest, M., … Lai, S. K. (2020). LPS-binding IgG arrests actively motile Salmonella Typhimurium in gastrointestinal mucus. Mucosal Immunol, 13(5), 814–823. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41385-020-0267-9
Schroeder, Holly A., Jay Newby, Alison Schaefer, Babu Subramani, Alan Tubbs, M. Gregory Forest, Ed Miao, and Samuel K. Lai. “LPS-binding IgG arrests actively motile Salmonella Typhimurium in gastrointestinal mucus.Mucosal Immunol 13, no. 5 (September 2020): 814–23. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41385-020-0267-9.
Schroeder HA, Newby J, Schaefer A, Subramani B, Tubbs A, Gregory Forest M, et al. LPS-binding IgG arrests actively motile Salmonella Typhimurium in gastrointestinal mucus. Mucosal Immunol. 2020 Sep;13(5):814–23.
Schroeder, Holly A., et al. “LPS-binding IgG arrests actively motile Salmonella Typhimurium in gastrointestinal mucus.Mucosal Immunol, vol. 13, no. 5, Sept. 2020, pp. 814–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41385-020-0267-9.
Schroeder HA, Newby J, Schaefer A, Subramani B, Tubbs A, Gregory Forest M, Miao E, Lai SK. LPS-binding IgG arrests actively motile Salmonella Typhimurium in gastrointestinal mucus. Mucosal Immunol. 2020 Sep;13(5):814–823.

Published In

Mucosal Immunol

DOI

EISSN

1935-3456

Publication Date

September 2020

Volume

13

Issue

5

Start / End Page

814 / 823

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Salmonella typhimurium
  • Salmonella Infections
  • Protein Binding
  • Polysaccharides
  • Mucus
  • Mice
  • Lipopolysaccharides
  • Intestinal Mucosa
  • Immunology
  • Immunoglobulin G