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Visual and Semantic Representations Predict Subsequent Memory in Perceptual and Conceptual Memory Tests.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Davis, SW; Geib, BR; Wing, EA; Wang, W-C; Hovhannisyan, M; Monge, ZA; Cabeza, R
Published in: Cereb Cortex
January 5, 2021

It is generally assumed that the encoding of a single event generates multiple memory representations, which contribute differently to subsequent episodic memory. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and representational similarity analysis to examine how visual and semantic representations predicted subsequent memory for single item encoding (e.g., seeing an orange). Three levels of visual representations corresponding to early, middle, and late visual processing stages were based on a deep neural network. Three levels of semantic representations were based on normative observed ("is round"), taxonomic ("is a fruit"), and encyclopedic features ("is sweet"). We identified brain regions where each representation type predicted later perceptual memory, conceptual memory, or both (general memory). Participants encoded objects during fMRI, and then completed both a word-based conceptual and picture-based perceptual memory test. Visual representations predicted subsequent perceptual memory in visual cortices, but also facilitated conceptual and general memory in more anterior regions. Semantic representations, in turn, predicted perceptual memory in visual cortex, conceptual memory in the perirhinal and inferior prefrontal cortex, and general memory in the angular gyrus. These results suggest that the contribution of visual and semantic representations to subsequent memory effects depends on a complex interaction between representation, test type, and storage location.

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Published In

Cereb Cortex

DOI

EISSN

1460-2199

Publication Date

January 5, 2021

Volume

31

Issue

2

Start / End Page

974 / 992

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Visual Perception
  • Visual Cortex
  • Semantics
  • Prefrontal Cortex
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • Memory, Episodic
  • Memory
  • Male
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Davis, S. W., Geib, B. R., Wing, E. A., Wang, W.-C., Hovhannisyan, M., Monge, Z. A., & Cabeza, R. (2021). Visual and Semantic Representations Predict Subsequent Memory in Perceptual and Conceptual Memory Tests. Cereb Cortex, 31(2), 974–992. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhaa269
Davis, Simon W., Benjamin R. Geib, Erik A. Wing, Wei-Chun Wang, Mariam Hovhannisyan, Zachary A. Monge, and Roberto Cabeza. “Visual and Semantic Representations Predict Subsequent Memory in Perceptual and Conceptual Memory Tests.Cereb Cortex 31, no. 2 (January 5, 2021): 974–92. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhaa269.
Davis SW, Geib BR, Wing EA, Wang W-C, Hovhannisyan M, Monge ZA, et al. Visual and Semantic Representations Predict Subsequent Memory in Perceptual and Conceptual Memory Tests. Cereb Cortex. 2021 Jan 5;31(2):974–92.
Davis, Simon W., et al. “Visual and Semantic Representations Predict Subsequent Memory in Perceptual and Conceptual Memory Tests.Cereb Cortex, vol. 31, no. 2, Jan. 2021, pp. 974–92. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/cercor/bhaa269.
Davis SW, Geib BR, Wing EA, Wang W-C, Hovhannisyan M, Monge ZA, Cabeza R. Visual and Semantic Representations Predict Subsequent Memory in Perceptual and Conceptual Memory Tests. Cereb Cortex. 2021 Jan 5;31(2):974–992.
Journal cover image

Published In

Cereb Cortex

DOI

EISSN

1460-2199

Publication Date

January 5, 2021

Volume

31

Issue

2

Start / End Page

974 / 992

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Visual Perception
  • Visual Cortex
  • Semantics
  • Prefrontal Cortex
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • Memory, Episodic
  • Memory
  • Male
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging