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Biased agonism at chemokine receptors.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Eiger, DS; Boldizsar, N; Honeycutt, CC; Gardner, J; Rajagopal, S
Published in: Cell Signal
February 2021

In the human chemokine system, interactions between the approximately 50 known endogenous chemokine ligands and 20 known chemokine receptors (CKRs) regulate a wide range of cellular functions and biological processes including immune cell activation and homeostasis, development, angiogenesis, and neuromodulation. CKRs are a family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), which represent the most common and versatile class of receptors in the human genome and the targets of approximately one third of all Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs. Chemokines and CKRs bind with significant promiscuity, as most CKRs can be activated by multiple chemokines and most chemokines can activate multiple CKRs. While these ligand-receptor interactions were previously regarded as redundant, it is now appreciated that many chemokine:CKR interactions display biased agonism, the phenomenon in which different ligands binding to the same receptor signal through different pathways with different efficacies, leading to distinct biological effects. Notably, these biased responses can be modulated through changes in ligand, receptor, and or the specific cellular context (system). In this review, we explore the biochemical mechanisms, functional consequences, and therapeutic potential of biased agonism in the chemokine system. An enhanced understanding of biased agonism in the chemokine system may prove transformative in the understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of biased signaling across all GPCR subtypes and aid in the development of biased pharmaceuticals with increased therapeutic efficacy and safer side effect profiles.

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Published In

Cell Signal

DOI

EISSN

1873-3913

Publication Date

February 2021

Volume

78

Start / End Page

109862

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Signal Transduction
  • Receptors, Chemokine
  • Ligands
  • Humans
  • Chemokines
  • Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Animals
  • 3101 Biochemistry and cell biology
  • 1116 Medical Physiology
  • 0601 Biochemistry and Cell Biology
 

Citation

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Eiger, D. S., Boldizsar, N., Honeycutt, C. C., Gardner, J., & Rajagopal, S. (2021). Biased agonism at chemokine receptors. Cell Signal, 78, 109862. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cellsig.2020.109862
Eiger, Dylan Scott, Noelia Boldizsar, Christopher Cole Honeycutt, Julia Gardner, and Sudarshan Rajagopal. “Biased agonism at chemokine receptors.Cell Signal 78 (February 2021): 109862. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cellsig.2020.109862.
Eiger DS, Boldizsar N, Honeycutt CC, Gardner J, Rajagopal S. Biased agonism at chemokine receptors. Cell Signal. 2021 Feb;78:109862.
Eiger, Dylan Scott, et al. “Biased agonism at chemokine receptors.Cell Signal, vol. 78, Feb. 2021, p. 109862. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cellsig.2020.109862.
Eiger DS, Boldizsar N, Honeycutt CC, Gardner J, Rajagopal S. Biased agonism at chemokine receptors. Cell Signal. 2021 Feb;78:109862.
Journal cover image

Published In

Cell Signal

DOI

EISSN

1873-3913

Publication Date

February 2021

Volume

78

Start / End Page

109862

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Signal Transduction
  • Receptors, Chemokine
  • Ligands
  • Humans
  • Chemokines
  • Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Animals
  • 3101 Biochemistry and cell biology
  • 1116 Medical Physiology
  • 0601 Biochemistry and Cell Biology