Skip to main content

The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Reynolds, K; Bazemore, C; Hanebuth, C; Hendren, S; Horn, M
Published in: J Educ Eval Health Prof
2021

PURPOSE: Rehabilitation science programs utilize cognitive and non-cognitive factors to select students who can complete the didactic and clinical portions of the program and pass the licensure exam. Cognitive factors such a prior grade point average and standardized test scores are known to be predictive of academic performance, but the relationship of non-cognitive factors and performance is less clear. The purpose of this systematic review was to explore the relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in rehabilitation science programs. METHODS: A search of 7 databases was conducted using the following eligibility criteria: graduate programs in physical therapy (PT), occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, United States-based programs, measurement of at least 1 non-cognitive factor, measurement of academic and/or clinical performance, and quantitative reporting of results. Articles were screened by title, abstract, and full text, and data were extracted. RESULTS: After the comprehensive screening, 21 articles were included in the review. Seventy-six percent of studies occurred in PT students. Grit, self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and stress were the most commonly studied factors. Only self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and personality traits were examined in clinical and academic contexts. The results were mixed for all non-cognitive factors. Higher grit and self-efficacy tended to be associated with better performance, while stress was generally associated with worse outcomes. CONCLUSION: No single non-cognitive factor was consistently related to clinical or academic performance in rehabilitation science students. There is insufficient evidence currently to recommend the evaluation of a specific non-cognitive factor for admissions decisions.

Duke Scholars

Published In

J Educ Eval Health Prof

DOI

EISSN

1975-5937

Publication Date

2021

Volume

18

Start / End Page

31

Location

Korea (South)

Related Subject Headings

  • United States
  • Students
  • Self Efficacy
  • Humans
  • Emotional Intelligence
  • Academic Performance
  • 3904 Specialist studies in education
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Reynolds, K., Bazemore, C., Hanebuth, C., Hendren, S., & Horn, M. (2021). The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review. J Educ Eval Health Prof, 18, 31. https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.31
Reynolds, Kelly, Caroline Bazemore, Cannon Hanebuth, Steph Hendren, and Maggie Horn. “The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review.J Educ Eval Health Prof 18 (2021): 31. https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.31.
Reynolds, Kelly, et al. “The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review.J Educ Eval Health Prof, vol. 18, 2021, p. 31. Pubmed, doi:10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.31.

Published In

J Educ Eval Health Prof

DOI

EISSN

1975-5937

Publication Date

2021

Volume

18

Start / End Page

31

Location

Korea (South)

Related Subject Headings

  • United States
  • Students
  • Self Efficacy
  • Humans
  • Emotional Intelligence
  • Academic Performance
  • 3904 Specialist studies in education