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The Role of Electronic Learning in Orthopaedic Graduate Medical Training: A Consensus From Leaders in Orthopaedic Training Programs

Publication ,  Journal Article
Bostrom, MPG; Lewis, KO; Berger, G
Published in: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
April 15, 2021

The US orthopaedic graduate medical education system is based on long established methods in education, but academic leaders at orthopaedic institutions now have the ability to use electronic learning innovations. Hospital for Special Surgery gathered graduate medical education leaders from orthopaedic training programs around the country and an electronic learning expert to review current orthopaedic residency and fellowship program practices. This group came to consensus with the following points: (1) current training methods do not take full advantage of available technology/innovations, (2) trainees inappropriately use electronic resources in the absence of or in an underdeveloped formal electronic training program, (3) trainees learn at different rates and in different ways requiring individualized plans for optimal content engagement, and (4) formal electronic learning programs better use time dedicated to educating trainees than informal programs. Orthopaedic graduate medical training programs that adopt these points can establish an electronic learning program to complement their traditional education program by (1) guaranteeing online content is standardized and approved, (2) reducing time spent covering standard lecture material and increasing time spent reviewing cases, and (3) engaging students of all learning backgrounds with content in both asynchronous and synchronous formats.

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Published In

Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

DOI

EISSN

1940-5480

ISSN

1067-151X

Publication Date

April 15, 2021

Volume

29

Issue

8

Start / End Page

317 / 325

Publisher

Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)

Related Subject Headings

  • Orthopedics
  • 1103 Clinical Sciences
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Bostrom, M. P. G., Lewis, K. O., & Berger, G. (2021). The Role of Electronic Learning in Orthopaedic Graduate Medical Training: A Consensus From Leaders in Orthopaedic Training Programs. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 29(8), 317–325. https://doi.org/10.5435/jaaos-d-20-00821
Bostrom, Mathias P. G., Kadriye O. Lewis, and Gavin Berger. “The Role of Electronic Learning in Orthopaedic Graduate Medical Training: A Consensus From Leaders in Orthopaedic Training Programs.” Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 29, no. 8 (April 15, 2021): 317–25. https://doi.org/10.5435/jaaos-d-20-00821.
Bostrom MPG, Lewis KO, Berger G. The Role of Electronic Learning in Orthopaedic Graduate Medical Training: A Consensus From Leaders in Orthopaedic Training Programs. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2021 Apr 15;29(8):317–25.
Bostrom, Mathias P. G., et al. “The Role of Electronic Learning in Orthopaedic Graduate Medical Training: A Consensus From Leaders in Orthopaedic Training Programs.” Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, vol. 29, no. 8, Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), Apr. 2021, pp. 317–25. Crossref, doi:10.5435/jaaos-d-20-00821.
Bostrom MPG, Lewis KO, Berger G. The Role of Electronic Learning in Orthopaedic Graduate Medical Training: A Consensus From Leaders in Orthopaedic Training Programs. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health); 2021 Apr 15;29(8):317–325.

Published In

Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

DOI

EISSN

1940-5480

ISSN

1067-151X

Publication Date

April 15, 2021

Volume

29

Issue

8

Start / End Page

317 / 325

Publisher

Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)

Related Subject Headings

  • Orthopedics
  • 1103 Clinical Sciences