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If you build it, will they use it? Use of a Digital Assistant for Self-Reporting of COVID-19 Rapid Antigen Test Results during Large Nationwide Community Testing Initiative.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Herbert, C; Shi, Q; Kheterpal, V; Nowak, C; Suvarna, T; Durnam, B; Schrader, S; Behar, S; Naeem, S; Tarrant, S; Kalibala, B; Singh, A; Lin, H ...
Published in: medRxiv
April 1, 2022

IMPORTANCE: Wide-spread distribution of rapid-antigen tests is integral to the United States' strategy to address COVID-19; however, it is estimated that few rapid-antigen test results are reported to local departments of health. OBJECTIVE: To characterize how often individuals in six communities throughout the United States used a digital assistant to log rapid-antigen test results and report them to their local Department of Health. DESIGN: This prospective cohort study is based on anonymously collected data from the beneficiaries of The Say Yes! Covid Test program, which distributed 3,000,000 rapid antigen tests at no cost to residents of six communities between April and October 2021. We provide a descriptive evaluation of beneficiaries' use of digital assistant for logging and reporting their rapid antigen test results. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: Number and proportion of tests logged and reported to the Department of Health through the digital assistant. RESULTS: A total of 178,785 test kits were ordered by the digital assistant, and 14,398 households used the digital assistant to log 41,465 test results. Overall, a small proportion of beneficiaries used the digital assistant (8%), but over 75% of those who used it reported their rapid antigen test results to their state public health department. The reporting behavior varied between communities and was significantly different for communities that were incentivized for reporting test results (p < 0.001). In all communities, positive tests were less reported than negative tests (60.4% vs 75.5%; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: These results indicate that app-based reporting with incentives may be an effective way to increase reporting of rapid tests for COVID-19; however, increasing the adoption of the digital assistant is a critical first step.

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medRxiv

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Publication Date

April 1, 2022

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United States
 

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Herbert, C., Shi, Q., Kheterpal, V., Nowak, C., Suvarna, T., Durnam, B., … Soni, A. (2022). If you build it, will they use it? Use of a Digital Assistant for Self-Reporting of COVID-19 Rapid Antigen Test Results during Large Nationwide Community Testing Initiative. MedRxiv. https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.03.31.22273242
Herbert, Carly, Qiming Shi, Vik Kheterpal, Chris Nowak, Thejas Suvarna, Basyl Durnam, Summer Schrader, et al. “If you build it, will they use it? Use of a Digital Assistant for Self-Reporting of COVID-19 Rapid Antigen Test Results during Large Nationwide Community Testing Initiative.MedRxiv, April 1, 2022. https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.03.31.22273242.
Herbert C, Shi Q, Kheterpal V, Nowak C, Suvarna T, Durnam B, Schrader S, Behar S, Naeem S, Tarrant S, Kalibala B, Singh A, Gerber B, Barton B, Lin H, Cohen-Wolkowiez M, Corbie-Smith G, Kibbe W, Marquez J, Baek J, Hafer N, Gibson L, O’Connor L, Broach J, Heetderks W, McManus D, Soni A. If you build it, will they use it? Use of a Digital Assistant for Self-Reporting of COVID-19 Rapid Antigen Test Results during Large Nationwide Community Testing Initiative. medRxiv. 2022 Apr 1;

Published In

medRxiv

DOI

Publication Date

April 1, 2022

Location

United States