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Music-Based Mentoring and Academic Improvement in High-Poverty Elementary Schools

Publication ,  Journal Article
Holbrook, HM; Martin, M; Glik, D; Hudziak, JJ; Copeland, WE; Lund, C; Fender, JG
Published in: Journal of Youth Development
January 1, 2022

Recent research links disparities in children’s language-related brain function to poverty and its correlates. Such disparities are hypothesized to underlie achievement gaps between students from low-income families and more advantaged peers. Interventions that improve language-related brain function in low-income students exist, but evaluations of their implementation within high-poverty elementary schools do not. This comparison-group study evaluates whether implementation within high-poverty elementary schools of Harmony Project music-based mentoring, previously shown in randomized controlled research to improve language-related brain function and literacy in low-income students, might be associated with academic improvement for participants compared with non-participating peers. Standardized academic achievement scores were evaluated retrospectively for 2nd graders who opted into or out of Harmony Project (HP) at baseline (nHP = 218; nnon-HP = 862) for weekly music-based mentoring over 2 years. Adjusting for baseline scores, HP participation was associated with higher standardized scores for math (+17 points; ß = .06, p = .02) and English language arts (+26 points; ß = .08, p = .002). Importantly, students with the lowest prior achievement scores showed the greatest gains for both math (+33 points; ß =.13, p =.02) and English language arts (+39 points; ß =.14, p =.02). Implementation within high-poverty elementary schools of a program previously found to improve language-related brain function in low-income students was associated with significant academic improvement for participants, particularly those with the lowest prior levels of achievement. Findings support the hypothesis that disparities in children’s language-related brain function linked to poverty and its correlates may underlie achievement gaps.

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Published In

Journal of Youth Development

DOI

EISSN

2325-4017

ISSN

2325-4009

Publication Date

January 1, 2022

Volume

17

Issue

1

Start / End Page

33 / 45
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Holbrook, H. M., Martin, M., Glik, D., Hudziak, J. J., Copeland, W. E., Lund, C., & Fender, J. G. (2022). Music-Based Mentoring and Academic Improvement in High-Poverty Elementary Schools. Journal of Youth Development, 17(1), 33–45. https://doi.org/10.5195/jyd.2022.1116
Holbrook, H. M., M. Martin, D. Glik, J. J. Hudziak, W. E. Copeland, C. Lund, and J. G. Fender. “Music-Based Mentoring and Academic Improvement in High-Poverty Elementary Schools.” Journal of Youth Development 17, no. 1 (January 1, 2022): 33–45. https://doi.org/10.5195/jyd.2022.1116.
Holbrook HM, Martin M, Glik D, Hudziak JJ, Copeland WE, Lund C, et al. Music-Based Mentoring and Academic Improvement in High-Poverty Elementary Schools. Journal of Youth Development. 2022 Jan 1;17(1):33–45.
Holbrook, H. M., et al. “Music-Based Mentoring and Academic Improvement in High-Poverty Elementary Schools.” Journal of Youth Development, vol. 17, no. 1, Jan. 2022, pp. 33–45. Scopus, doi:10.5195/jyd.2022.1116.
Holbrook HM, Martin M, Glik D, Hudziak JJ, Copeland WE, Lund C, Fender JG. Music-Based Mentoring and Academic Improvement in High-Poverty Elementary Schools. Journal of Youth Development. 2022 Jan 1;17(1):33–45.

Published In

Journal of Youth Development

DOI

EISSN

2325-4017

ISSN

2325-4009

Publication Date

January 1, 2022

Volume

17

Issue

1

Start / End Page

33 / 45