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Lifecourse Traumatic Events and Cognitive Aging in the Health and Retirement Study.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Stebbins, RC; Maselko, J; Yang, YC; Plassman, BL; Edwards, JK; Aiello, AE
Published in: Am J Prev Med
November 2022

INTRODUCTION: Much of the heterogeneity in the rate of cognitive decline and the age of dementia onset remains unexplained, and there is compelling data supporting psychosocial stressors as important risk factors. However, the literature has yet to come to a consensus on whether there is a causal relationship and, if there is, its direction and strength. This study estimates the relationship between lifecourse traumatic events and cognitive trajectories and predicted dementia incidence. METHODS: Using data on 7,785 participants aged ≥65 years from the Health and Retirement Study, this study estimated the association between lifecourse experience of 10 traumatic events (e.g., losing a child) and trajectories of Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status from 2006 to 2016 using linear mixed-effects models and predicted incident dementia from 2006 to 2014 using cumulative incidence functions (data analysis was in 2020-2022). Inverse probability weights accounted for loss to follow-up and confounding by sex, education, race/ethnicity, and age. RESULTS: Experiencing 1 or more traumatic events over the lifecourse was associated with accelerated decline compared with experiencing no events (e.g., β= -0.05 [95% CI= -0.07, -0.02] Health and Retirement Study-Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status units/year; 1 vs 0 events). In contrast, experiencing traumatic events was associated with better cognitive function cross-sectionally. Furthermore, the impact of trauma on cognitive decline was of greater magnitude when it occurred after the age of 64 years. However, the magnitude and direction of association varied by the specific traumatic event. There were no associations with predicted incident dementia. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that researchers and clinicians should not aggregate traumatic events for understanding the risk of accelerated cognitive decline.

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Published In

Am J Prev Med

DOI

EISSN

1873-2607

Publication Date

November 2022

Volume

63

Issue

5

Start / End Page

818 / 826

Location

Netherlands

Related Subject Headings

  • Retirement
  • Public Health
  • Humans
  • Dementia
  • Cognitive Dysfunction
  • Cognitive Aging
  • Cognition
  • Child
  • Aging
  • 42 Health sciences
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Stebbins, R. C., Maselko, J., Yang, Y. C., Plassman, B. L., Edwards, J. K., & Aiello, A. E. (2022). Lifecourse Traumatic Events and Cognitive Aging in the Health and Retirement Study. Am J Prev Med, 63(5), 818–826. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2022.05.007
Stebbins, Rebecca C., Joanna Maselko, Y Claire Yang, Brenda L. Plassman, Jessie K. Edwards, and Allison E. Aiello. “Lifecourse Traumatic Events and Cognitive Aging in the Health and Retirement Study.Am J Prev Med 63, no. 5 (November 2022): 818–26. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2022.05.007.
Stebbins RC, Maselko J, Yang YC, Plassman BL, Edwards JK, Aiello AE. Lifecourse Traumatic Events and Cognitive Aging in the Health and Retirement Study. Am J Prev Med. 2022 Nov;63(5):818–26.
Stebbins, Rebecca C., et al. “Lifecourse Traumatic Events and Cognitive Aging in the Health and Retirement Study.Am J Prev Med, vol. 63, no. 5, Nov. 2022, pp. 818–26. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2022.05.007.
Stebbins RC, Maselko J, Yang YC, Plassman BL, Edwards JK, Aiello AE. Lifecourse Traumatic Events and Cognitive Aging in the Health and Retirement Study. Am J Prev Med. 2022 Nov;63(5):818–826.
Journal cover image

Published In

Am J Prev Med

DOI

EISSN

1873-2607

Publication Date

November 2022

Volume

63

Issue

5

Start / End Page

818 / 826

Location

Netherlands

Related Subject Headings

  • Retirement
  • Public Health
  • Humans
  • Dementia
  • Cognitive Dysfunction
  • Cognitive Aging
  • Cognition
  • Child
  • Aging
  • 42 Health sciences