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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Significantly Affect Midlife Cognitive Functioning Within the General Population: Findings From a Prospective Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Theadom, A; Barker-Collo, S; Parag, V; Caspi, A; Moffitt, TE; Hogan, S; Ramrakha, S; Poulton, R
Published in: The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation
March 2024

To determine whether differences exist in mid-adulthood cognitive functioning in people with and without history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).Community-based study.People born between April 1, 1972, and March 31, 1973, recruited into the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Longitudinal Study, who completed neuropsychological assessments in mid-adulthood. Participants who had experienced a moderate or severe TBI or mTBI in the past 12 months were excluded.Longitudinal, prospective, observational study.Data were collected on sociodemographic characteristics, medical history, childhood cognition (between 7 and 11 years), and alcohol and substance dependence (from 21 years of age). mTBI history was determined from accident and medical records (from birth to 45 years of age). Participants were classified as having 1 mTBI and more in their lifetime or no mTBI. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-IV) and Trail Making Tests A and B (between 38 and 45 years of age) were used to assess cognitive functioning. T tests and effect sizes were used to identify any differences on cognitive functioning domains between the mTBI and no mTBI groups. Regression models explored the relative contribution of number of mTBIs and age of first mTBI and sociodemographic/lifestyle variables on cognitive functioning.Of the 885 participants, 518 (58.5%) had experienced at least 1 mTBI over their lifetime, with a mean number of 2.5 mTBIs. The mTBI group had significantly slower processing speed ( P < .01, d = 0.23) in mid-adulthood than the no TBI controls, with a medium effect size. However, the relationship no longer remained significant after controlling for childhood cognition, sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. No significant differences were observed for overall intelligence, verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, working memory, attention, or cognitive flexibility. Childhood cognition was not linked to likelihood of sustaining mTBI later in life.mTBI histories in the general population were not associated with lower cognitive functioning in mid-adulthood once sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were taken into account.

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Published In

The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation

DOI

EISSN

1550-509X

ISSN

0885-9701

Publication Date

March 2024

Volume

39

Issue

2

Start / End Page

E70 / E82

Related Subject Headings

  • Rehabilitation
  • Prospective Studies
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Cohort Studies
  • Cognition
  • Child
  • Brain Concussion
  • Adult
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Theadom, A., Barker-Collo, S., Parag, V., Caspi, A., Moffitt, T. E., Hogan, S., … Poulton, R. (2024). Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Significantly Affect Midlife Cognitive Functioning Within the General Population: Findings From a Prospective Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study. The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 39(2), E70–E82. https://doi.org/10.1097/htr.0000000000000875
Theadom, Alice, Suzanne Barker-Collo, Varsha Parag, Avshalom Caspi, Terri E. Moffitt, Sean Hogan, Sandhya Ramrakha, and Richie Poulton. “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Significantly Affect Midlife Cognitive Functioning Within the General Population: Findings From a Prospective Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study.The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 39, no. 2 (March 2024): E70–82. https://doi.org/10.1097/htr.0000000000000875.
Theadom A, Barker-Collo S, Parag V, Caspi A, Moffitt TE, Hogan S, et al. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Significantly Affect Midlife Cognitive Functioning Within the General Population: Findings From a Prospective Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study. The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation. 2024 Mar;39(2):E70–82.
Theadom, Alice, et al. “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Significantly Affect Midlife Cognitive Functioning Within the General Population: Findings From a Prospective Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study.The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, vol. 39, no. 2, Mar. 2024, pp. E70–82. Epmc, doi:10.1097/htr.0000000000000875.
Theadom A, Barker-Collo S, Parag V, Caspi A, Moffitt TE, Hogan S, Ramrakha S, Poulton R. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Significantly Affect Midlife Cognitive Functioning Within the General Population: Findings From a Prospective Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study. The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation. 2024 Mar;39(2):E70–E82.

Published In

The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation

DOI

EISSN

1550-509X

ISSN

0885-9701

Publication Date

March 2024

Volume

39

Issue

2

Start / End Page

E70 / E82

Related Subject Headings

  • Rehabilitation
  • Prospective Studies
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Cohort Studies
  • Cognition
  • Child
  • Brain Concussion
  • Adult