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Health Sciences Librarianship's Status as a Profession Is Unclear, According to Its Members

Publication ,  Journal Article
Kaplan, SJ
Published in: Evidence Based Library and Information Practice
January 1, 2023

Objective – To determine health sciences librarians' attitudes toward professionalism and to examine relationships between professionalism attributes and participant characteristics as defined by the Richard H. Hall Professionalism Inventory. Design – Cross-sectional online survey using the Richard H. Hall Professionalism Inventory. Setting – Electronic mailing lists of the Medical Library Association (MLA), the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Health Sciences Interest Group, and the Canadian Health Libraries Association (CHLA). Subjects – There were 430 participants. Methods – The online survey, created in REDCap, was distributed electronically across multiple mailing lists during June and July of 2019. Quantitative analysis included descriptive statistics and ANOVA conducted in R with reliability determined by Cronbach's alpha. Main Results – Professionalism scores for health sciences librarians were lowest in public service and self-regulation, and highest in professional organization as referent, autonomy, and sense of calling. Individuals with a degree in health sciences scored lower on a sense of calling than individuals with Library and Information Science (LIS) degrees. Faculty benefits such as tenure decreased sense of calling. There were statistically significant differences according to role (e.g., archives, administration). Subject specialty librarians had lower scores in most attributes. Conclusion – Health sciences librarianship does not clearly meet the criteria of a profession. Its heterogeneity of specializations and receptiveness to diverse backgrounds and perspectives are possible threats to its ability to create a cohesive identity. Further, duties that can be considered non-library work appear to correlate with lower professionalism scores, even when they are associated with faculty status.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

DOI

EISSN

1715-720X

Publication Date

January 1, 2023

Volume

18

Issue

2

Start / End Page

117 / 119

Related Subject Headings

  • 4610 Library and information studies
  • 0807 Library and Information Studies
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Kaplan, S. J. (2023). Health Sciences Librarianship's Status as a Profession Is Unclear, According to Its Members. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, 18(2), 117–119. https://doi.org/10.18438/eblip30340
Kaplan, S. J. “Health Sciences Librarianship's Status as a Profession Is Unclear, According to Its Members.” Evidence Based Library and Information Practice 18, no. 2 (January 1, 2023): 117–19. https://doi.org/10.18438/eblip30340.
Kaplan SJ. Health Sciences Librarianship's Status as a Profession Is Unclear, According to Its Members. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. 2023 Jan 1;18(2):117–9.
Kaplan, S. J. “Health Sciences Librarianship's Status as a Profession Is Unclear, According to Its Members.” Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, vol. 18, no. 2, Jan. 2023, pp. 117–19. Scopus, doi:10.18438/eblip30340.
Kaplan SJ. Health Sciences Librarianship's Status as a Profession Is Unclear, According to Its Members. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. 2023 Jan 1;18(2):117–119.

Published In

Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

DOI

EISSN

1715-720X

Publication Date

January 1, 2023

Volume

18

Issue

2

Start / End Page

117 / 119

Related Subject Headings

  • 4610 Library and information studies
  • 0807 Library and Information Studies