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Moderation of the effect of adolescent-onset cannabis use on adult psychosis by a functional polymorphism in the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: longitudinal evidence of a gene X environment interaction.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Caspi, A; Moffitt, TE; Cannon, M; McClay, J; Murray, R; Harrington, H; Taylor, A; Arseneault, L; Williams, B; Braithwaite, A; Poulton, R; Craig, IW
Published in: Biological psychiatry
May 2005

Recent evidence documents that cannabis use by young people is a modest statistical risk factor for psychotic symptoms in adulthood, such as hallucinations and delusions, as well as clinically significant schizophrenia. The vast majority of cannabis users do not develop psychosis, however, prompting us to hypothesize that some people are genetically vulnerable to the deleterious effects of cannabis.In a longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort followed to adulthood, we tested why cannabis use is associated with the emergence of psychosis in a minority of users, but not in others.A functional polymorphism in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene moderated the influence of adolescent cannabis use on developing adult psychosis. Carriers of the COMT valine158 allele were most likely to exhibit psychotic symptoms and to develop schizophreniform disorder if they used cannabis. Cannabis use had no such adverse influence on individuals with two copies of the methionine allele.These findings provide evidence of a gene x environment interaction and suggest that a role of some susceptibility genes is to influence vulnerability to environmental pathogens.

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Published In

Biological psychiatry

DOI

EISSN

1873-2402

ISSN

0006-3223

Publication Date

May 2005

Volume

57

Issue

10

Start / End Page

1117 / 1127

Related Subject Headings

  • Risk Assessment
  • Psychotic Disorders
  • Psychiatry
  • Polymorphism, Genetic
  • Marijuana Smoking
  • Male
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Hallucinations
  • Genotype
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Caspi, A., Moffitt, T. E., Cannon, M., McClay, J., Murray, R., Harrington, H., … Craig, I. W. (2005). Moderation of the effect of adolescent-onset cannabis use on adult psychosis by a functional polymorphism in the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: longitudinal evidence of a gene X environment interaction. Biological Psychiatry, 57(10), 1117–1127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.01.026
Caspi, Avshalom, Terrie E. Moffitt, Mary Cannon, Joseph McClay, Robin Murray, HonaLee Harrington, Alan Taylor, et al. “Moderation of the effect of adolescent-onset cannabis use on adult psychosis by a functional polymorphism in the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: longitudinal evidence of a gene X environment interaction.Biological Psychiatry 57, no. 10 (May 2005): 1117–27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.01.026.
Caspi A, Moffitt TE, Cannon M, McClay J, Murray R, Harrington H, Taylor A, Arseneault L, Williams B, Braithwaite A, Poulton R, Craig IW. Moderation of the effect of adolescent-onset cannabis use on adult psychosis by a functional polymorphism in the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: longitudinal evidence of a gene X environment interaction. Biological psychiatry. 2005 May;57(10):1117–1127.
Journal cover image

Published In

Biological psychiatry

DOI

EISSN

1873-2402

ISSN

0006-3223

Publication Date

May 2005

Volume

57

Issue

10

Start / End Page

1117 / 1127

Related Subject Headings

  • Risk Assessment
  • Psychotic Disorders
  • Psychiatry
  • Polymorphism, Genetic
  • Marijuana Smoking
  • Male
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Humans
  • Hallucinations
  • Genotype