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Allelic association of sequence variants in the herpes virus entry mediator-B gene (PVRL2) with the severity of multiple sclerosis.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Schmidt, S; Pericak-Vance, MA; Sawcer, S; Barcellos, LF; Hart, J; Sims, J; Prokop, AM; van der Walt, J; DeLoa, C; Lincoln, RR; Oksenberg, JR ...
Published in: Genes Immun
July 2006

Discrepant findings have been reported regarding an association of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene with the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS). To resolve these discrepancies, we examined common sequence variation in six candidate genes residing in a 380-kb genomic region surrounding and including the APOE locus for an association with MS severity. We genotyped at least three polymorphisms in each of six candidate genes in 1,540 Caucasian MS families (729 single-case and multiple-case families from the United States, 811 single-case families from the UK). By applying the quantitative transmission/disequilibrium test to a recently proposed MS severity score, the only statistically significant (P=0.003) association with MS severity was found for an intronic variant in the Herpes Virus Entry Mediator-B Gene PVRL2. Additional genotyping extended the association to a 16.6 kb block spanning intron 1 to intron 2 of the gene. Sequencing of PVRL2 failed to identify variants with an obvious functional role. In conclusion, the analysis of a very large data set suggests that genetic polymorphisms in PVRL2 may influence MS severity and supports the possibility that viral factors may contribute to the clinical course of MS, consistent with previous reports.

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Published In

Genes Immun

DOI

ISSN

1466-4879

Publication Date

July 2006

Volume

7

Issue

5

Start / End Page

384 / 392

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • White People
  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Receptors, Virus
  • Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Member 14
  • Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Male
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Schmidt, S., Pericak-Vance, M. A., Sawcer, S., Barcellos, L. F., Hart, J., Sims, J., … Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Group, . (2006). Allelic association of sequence variants in the herpes virus entry mediator-B gene (PVRL2) with the severity of multiple sclerosis. Genes Immun, 7(5), 384–392. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.gene.6364311
Schmidt, S., M. A. Pericak-Vance, S. Sawcer, L. F. Barcellos, J. Hart, J. Sims, A. M. Prokop, et al. “Allelic association of sequence variants in the herpes virus entry mediator-B gene (PVRL2) with the severity of multiple sclerosis.Genes Immun 7, no. 5 (July 2006): 384–92. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.gene.6364311.
Schmidt S, Pericak-Vance MA, Sawcer S, Barcellos LF, Hart J, Sims J, et al. Allelic association of sequence variants in the herpes virus entry mediator-B gene (PVRL2) with the severity of multiple sclerosis. Genes Immun. 2006 Jul;7(5):384–92.
Schmidt, S., et al. “Allelic association of sequence variants in the herpes virus entry mediator-B gene (PVRL2) with the severity of multiple sclerosis.Genes Immun, vol. 7, no. 5, July 2006, pp. 384–92. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/sj.gene.6364311.
Schmidt S, Pericak-Vance MA, Sawcer S, Barcellos LF, Hart J, Sims J, Prokop AM, van der Walt J, DeLoa C, Lincoln RR, Oksenberg JR, Compston A, Hauser SL, Haines JL, Gregory SG, Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Group. Allelic association of sequence variants in the herpes virus entry mediator-B gene (PVRL2) with the severity of multiple sclerosis. Genes Immun. 2006 Jul;7(5):384–392.

Published In

Genes Immun

DOI

ISSN

1466-4879

Publication Date

July 2006

Volume

7

Issue

5

Start / End Page

384 / 392

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • White People
  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Receptors, Virus
  • Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Member 14
  • Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Male