Skip to main content
release_alert
Welcome to the new Scholars 3.0! Read about new features and let us know what you think.
cancel
Journal cover image

Human centromeric chromatin is a dynamic chromosomal domain that can spread over noncentromeric DNA.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Lam, AL; Boivin, CD; Bonney, CF; Rudd, MK; Sullivan, BA
Published in: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
March 14, 2006

Human centromeres are specialized chromatin domains containing the centromeric histone H3 variant CENP-A. CENP-A nucleosomes are interspersed with nucleosomes containing histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4, distinguishing centromeric chromatin (CEN chromatin) from flanking heterochromatin that is defined by H3 lysine 9 methylation. To understand the relationship between chromatin organization and the genomic structure of human centromeres, we compared molecular profiles of three endogenous human centromeres, defined by uninterrupted higher-order alpha-satellite DNA, with human artificial chromosomes that contain discontinuous blocks of higher-order alpha-satellite DNA and noncentromeric DNA. The underlying sequence did not correlate with chromatin states, because both higher-order alpha-satellite DNA and noncentromeric DNA were enriched for modifications that define CEN chromatin, euchromatin, and heterochromatin. Human artificial chromosomes were also organized into distinct domains. CENP-A and heterochromatin were assembled over noncentromeric DNA, including the gene blasticidin, into nonoverlapping domains. Blasticidin transcripts were enriched at sites of CENP-A binding but not at H3 methylated at lysine 9, indicating that formation of CEN chromatin within a repetitive DNA environment does not preclude gene expression. Finally, we tested the role of centric heterochromatin as a centromeric boundary by increasing CENP-A dosage to expand the CEN domain. In response, H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, but not trimethylation, was markedly decreased at all centromeres examined. We propose that human centromere regions normally exist in a dynamic state in which a regional boundary, defined by H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, separates CEN chromatin from constitutive heterochromatin.

Duke Scholars

Altmetric Attention Stats
Dimensions Citation Stats

Published In

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A

DOI

ISSN

0027-8424

Publication Date

March 14, 2006

Volume

103

Issue

11

Start / End Page

4186 / 4191

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Transcription, Genetic
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
  • Immunoprecipitation
  • Humans
  • Heterochromatin
  • DNA, Satellite
  • DNA
  • Chromosomes, Human
  • Chromosomes, Artificial, Human
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Lam, A. L., Boivin, C. D., Bonney, C. F., Rudd, M. K., & Sullivan, B. A. (2006). Human centromeric chromatin is a dynamic chromosomal domain that can spread over noncentromeric DNA. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 103(11), 4186–4191. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0507947103
Lam, Ai Leen, Christopher D. Boivin, Caitlin F. Bonney, M Katharine Rudd, and Beth A. Sullivan. “Human centromeric chromatin is a dynamic chromosomal domain that can spread over noncentromeric DNA.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103, no. 11 (March 14, 2006): 4186–91. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0507947103.
Lam AL, Boivin CD, Bonney CF, Rudd MK, Sullivan BA. Human centromeric chromatin is a dynamic chromosomal domain that can spread over noncentromeric DNA. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Mar 14;103(11):4186–91.
Lam, Ai Leen, et al. “Human centromeric chromatin is a dynamic chromosomal domain that can spread over noncentromeric DNA.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, vol. 103, no. 11, Mar. 2006, pp. 4186–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1073/pnas.0507947103.
Lam AL, Boivin CD, Bonney CF, Rudd MK, Sullivan BA. Human centromeric chromatin is a dynamic chromosomal domain that can spread over noncentromeric DNA. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Mar 14;103(11):4186–4191.
Journal cover image

Published In

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A

DOI

ISSN

0027-8424

Publication Date

March 14, 2006

Volume

103

Issue

11

Start / End Page

4186 / 4191

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Transcription, Genetic
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
  • Immunoprecipitation
  • Humans
  • Heterochromatin
  • DNA, Satellite
  • DNA
  • Chromosomes, Human
  • Chromosomes, Artificial, Human