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A parallel functional topography between medial and lateral prefrontal cortex: evidence and implications for cognitive control.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Taren, AA; Venkatraman, V; Huettel, SA
Published in: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
March 2011

The dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (dmPFC and dlPFC) together support cognitive control, with dmPFC responsible for monitoring performance and dlPFC responsible for adjusting behavior. The dlPFC contains a topographic organization that reflects complexity of control demands, with more anterior regions guiding increasingly abstract processing. Recent evidence for a similar gradient within dmPFC suggests the possibility of parallel, hierarchical organization. Here, we measured connectivity between functional nodes of dmPFC and dlPFC using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans. We found a posterior-to-anterior connectivity gradient; posterior dmPFC maximally connected to posterior dlPFC and anterior dmPFC maximally connected to anterior dlPFC. This parallel topographic pattern replicated across three independent datasets collected on different scanners, within individual participants, and through both point-to-point and voxelwise analyses. We posit a model of cognitive control characterized by hierarchical interactions--whose level depends on current environmental demands--between functional subdivisions of medial and lateral PFC.

Duke Scholars

Published In

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

DOI

EISSN

1529-2401

ISSN

0270-6474

Publication Date

March 2011

Volume

31

Issue

13

Start / End Page

5026 / 5031

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Prefrontal Cortex
  • Photic Stimulation
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Models, Neurological
  • Male
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Cognition
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Taren, A. A., Venkatraman, V., & Huettel, S. A. (2011). A parallel functional topography between medial and lateral prefrontal cortex: evidence and implications for cognitive control. The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 31(13), 5026–5031. https://doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.5762-10.2011
Taren, Adrienne A., Vinod Venkatraman, and Scott A. Huettel. “A parallel functional topography between medial and lateral prefrontal cortex: evidence and implications for cognitive control.The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 31, no. 13 (March 2011): 5026–31. https://doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.5762-10.2011.
Taren AA, Venkatraman V, Huettel SA. A parallel functional topography between medial and lateral prefrontal cortex: evidence and implications for cognitive control. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience. 2011 Mar;31(13):5026–31.
Taren, Adrienne A., et al. “A parallel functional topography between medial and lateral prefrontal cortex: evidence and implications for cognitive control.The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, vol. 31, no. 13, Mar. 2011, pp. 5026–31. Epmc, doi:10.1523/jneurosci.5762-10.2011.
Taren AA, Venkatraman V, Huettel SA. A parallel functional topography between medial and lateral prefrontal cortex: evidence and implications for cognitive control. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience. 2011 Mar;31(13):5026–5031.

Published In

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

DOI

EISSN

1529-2401

ISSN

0270-6474

Publication Date

March 2011

Volume

31

Issue

13

Start / End Page

5026 / 5031

Related Subject Headings

  • Young Adult
  • Prefrontal Cortex
  • Photic Stimulation
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Models, Neurological
  • Male
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Cognition