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Pharmacokinetics of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (cyclin B1 and CDC 2 kinase) in the vessel wall in vivo: enhanced therapeutic utility for restenosis by HVJ-liposome delivery.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Morishita, R; Gibbons, GH; Kaneda, Y; Ogihara, T; Dzau, VJ
Published in: Gene
November 4, 1994

Using a highly efficient viral HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan) liposome-mediated transfer method, we examined the cellular fate of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (oligos) in the vessel wall in vivo. Direct transfer of unmodified FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate)-labeled oligos into injured rat carotid arteries showed, localized in the medial layer, fluorescence that disappeared within 1 day. In contrast, transfection of unmodified FITC-oligos by the HVJ-liposome method showed, concentrated in the medial layer, high levels of fluorescence that were sustained for at least 1 week. Moreover, we demonstrated nuclear localization and accumulation of fluorescence in the vessel wall using this method. To examine the therapeutic utility of this method, we transferred antisense phosphorothioate oligos against cyclin B1- and CDC2 kinase-encoding genes into balloon-injured rat carotid artery as a potential therapy for experimental restenosis. Two weeks after transfection, antisense oligo treatment directed against either CDC2 kinase or cyclin B1 resulted in a partial, but significant, inhibition in neointima formation. In contrast, transfection of either sense or scrambled control oligos had no effect. Interestingly, co-transfection of antisense oligos against CDC2 kinase and cyclin B resulted in further inhibition of neointima formation, as compared to blockade of either gene target alone. These results demonstrate that: (i) the HVJ-liposome method enhances the half life and nuclear localization of antisense oligos in the vessel wall in vivo; and (ii) HVJ-mediated administration of antisense CDC2 kinase and cyclin B1 oligos produces a sustained inhibition of neointima formation after balloon angioplasty.

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Published In

Gene

DOI

ISSN

0378-1119

Publication Date

November 4, 1994

Volume

149

Issue

1

Start / End Page

13 / 19

Location

Netherlands

Related Subject Headings

  • Rats
  • Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human
  • Oligonucleotides, Antisense
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Liposomes
  • Genetic Therapy
  • Feasibility Studies
  • Drug Carriers
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cyclins
 

Citation

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Morishita, R., Gibbons, G. H., Kaneda, Y., Ogihara, T., & Dzau, V. J. (1994). Pharmacokinetics of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (cyclin B1 and CDC 2 kinase) in the vessel wall in vivo: enhanced therapeutic utility for restenosis by HVJ-liposome delivery. Gene, 149(1), 13–19. https://doi.org/10.1016/0378-1119(94)90406-5
Morishita, R., G. H. Gibbons, Y. Kaneda, T. Ogihara, and V. J. Dzau. “Pharmacokinetics of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (cyclin B1 and CDC 2 kinase) in the vessel wall in vivo: enhanced therapeutic utility for restenosis by HVJ-liposome delivery.Gene 149, no. 1 (November 4, 1994): 13–19. https://doi.org/10.1016/0378-1119(94)90406-5.
Journal cover image

Published In

Gene

DOI

ISSN

0378-1119

Publication Date

November 4, 1994

Volume

149

Issue

1

Start / End Page

13 / 19

Location

Netherlands

Related Subject Headings

  • Rats
  • Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human
  • Oligonucleotides, Antisense
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Liposomes
  • Genetic Therapy
  • Feasibility Studies
  • Drug Carriers
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cyclins