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Shear-wave generation using acoustic radiation force: in vivo and ex vivo results.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Nightingale, K; McAleavey, S; Trahey, G
Published in: Ultrasound in medicine & biology
December 2003

Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging involves the mechanical excitation of tissue using localized, impulsive radiation force. This results in shear-wave propagation away from the region of excitation. Using a single diagnostic transducer on a modified commercial ultrasound (US) scanner with conventional beam-forming architecture, repeated excitations with multiple look directions facilitate imaging shear-wave propagation. Direct inversion methods are then applied to estimate the associated Young's modulus. Shear-wave images are generated in tissue-mimicking phantoms, ex vivo human breast tissue and in vivo in the human abdomen. Mean Young's modulus values of between 3.8 and 5.6 kPa, 11.7 kPa and 14.0 kPa were estimated for fat, fibroadenoma and skin, respectively. Reasonable agreement is demonstrated between structures in matched B-mode and reconstructed modulus images. Although the relatively small magnitude of the displacement data presents some challenges, the reconstructions suggest the clinical feasibility of radiation force induced shear-wave imaging.

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Published In

Ultrasound in medicine & biology

DOI

EISSN

1879-291X

ISSN

0301-5629

Publication Date

December 2003

Volume

29

Issue

12

Start / End Page

1715 / 1723

Related Subject Headings

  • Ultrasonography
  • Stress, Mechanical
  • Skin
  • Phantoms, Imaging
  • Palpation
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Humans
  • Fibroadenoma
  • Elasticity
  • Adipose Tissue
 

Citation

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ICMJE
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Nightingale, K., McAleavey, S., & Trahey, G. (2003). Shear-wave generation using acoustic radiation force: in vivo and ex vivo results. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 29(12), 1715–1723. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2003.08.008
Nightingale, Kathryn, Stephen McAleavey, and Gregg Trahey. “Shear-wave generation using acoustic radiation force: in vivo and ex vivo results.Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology 29, no. 12 (December 2003): 1715–23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2003.08.008.
Nightingale K, McAleavey S, Trahey G. Shear-wave generation using acoustic radiation force: in vivo and ex vivo results. Ultrasound in medicine & biology. 2003 Dec;29(12):1715–23.
Nightingale, Kathryn, et al. “Shear-wave generation using acoustic radiation force: in vivo and ex vivo results.Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, vol. 29, no. 12, Dec. 2003, pp. 1715–23. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2003.08.008.
Nightingale K, McAleavey S, Trahey G. Shear-wave generation using acoustic radiation force: in vivo and ex vivo results. Ultrasound in medicine & biology. 2003 Dec;29(12):1715–1723.
Journal cover image

Published In

Ultrasound in medicine & biology

DOI

EISSN

1879-291X

ISSN

0301-5629

Publication Date

December 2003

Volume

29

Issue

12

Start / End Page

1715 / 1723

Related Subject Headings

  • Ultrasonography
  • Stress, Mechanical
  • Skin
  • Phantoms, Imaging
  • Palpation
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Humans
  • Fibroadenoma
  • Elasticity
  • Adipose Tissue